Archive for the ‘Wednesday Evening Sermons’ Category

Embrace The New Now

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

Embrace The New Now

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Strange and Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Conversion / 1 Peter 4:3–6

 In England there is a paper factory that makes the finest stationery in the world. One day a man touring the factory asked what it was made from. He was shown a huge pile of old rags and told that the rag content was what determined the quality of the paper. The visitor wouldn’t believe it. In weeks he received from the company a package of paper with his initials embossed on it. On the top piece were written the words “Dirty rags transformed.”

The same is true of the Christian life. It is a process of transformation from what we were into something new and wonderful.1

1 Michael P. Green, 1500 Illustrations for Biblical Preaching (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2000), 81.

Last week we discovered that we should arm ourselves with the mind of Christ in order to endure sufferings and live right. In tonight’s passage, we see that Peter turns the focus on how we should view our past before Christ. In light of the salvation that was purchased for us we are to vigorously live in the now because we have wasted enough time in the past, our former friends will not understand us, and our future is secure. As believers we are to embrace the new now.

Embrace the New Now Because Our Past Deeds Were a Waste.

1 Peter 4:3 KJV

For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the Gentiles, when we walked in lasciviousness, lusts, excess of wine, revellings, banquetings, and abominable idolatries:

 • lasciviousness

Then the apostle enumerates some of the sins which were part of that world out from which they were separated. “Lasciviousness” is the translation of a word which refers to actions that excite disgust and shock public decency. In the New Testament, the prominent idea in the word is that of sensuality.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • lusts

The Greek word translated “lusts” is not limited to the sense of a sexual desire, but has the unrestricted sense of a passionate desire, here a sinful one, as the context indicates.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • excess of wine

The words “excess of wine” are the translation of a Greek word made of two words, “wine” and “to bubble up or overflow.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • revellings

“Revellings” is the translation of a word which meant at first, “a village merrymaking.” Then it came to mean “a carousal” such as a party of revellers parading the streets, or revels held in religious ceremonies, wild, furious. and ecstatic.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • banquetings

“Banquetings” is from a Greek word speaking of drinking bouts possibly held in connection with pagan religious rites such as Paul speaks of in I Corinthians 10:14 where he forbids Christians to drink the cup of demons.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • abominable idolatries

The Greek word translated “abominable” means “contrary to law and justice, illicit, criminal.” These idolatries were forbidden by Roman law. They must have been pretty bad1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

Embrace The New Now Because Our Old Friends Will Not Understand.

1 Peter 4:4 KJV

Wherein they think it strange that ye run not with them to the same excess of riot, speaking evil of you:

 • Your new choices are seen as strange. You are headed in different directions.

2 Corinthians 6:14–17 KJV

Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? 

And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? 

And what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. 

Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you,

 • You no longer hang out with the same type of folks.

Psalm 1:1 KJV

Blessed is the man That walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, Nor standeth in the way of sinners, Nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful.

 • Same excess of riot

The word “excess” is the translation of a Greek word meaning literally “a pouring forth or an overflowing.” It was used in classical Greek of the tides which fill the hollows. Alford translates it by the word “slough,” a state of moral degradation or spiritual dejection into which one sinks or from which one cannot free one’s self.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • Now they speak evil of you

The people of the world, the former associates of these Christians to whom Peter is writing, thought it a thing foreign to the natures of these Christians when they did not run any more in a troop like a band of revellers with them in the same slough of dissoluteness. They did not realize that their totally depraved nature which before salvation had given them a love for sinful things, now had its power over them broken, and that another nature, the divine nature, had been given them as their new motivating principle of life which caused them to hate the things they once loved and love the things they once hated.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 113.

A young girl who had recently become a Christian asked the famous Baptist Preacher Charles Spurgeon…”What friends do I need to give-up now?” The Prince of Preachers replied “Hey, you do not have to give up any of your friends, they would give you up” 

Embrace The New Now Because Your Future Is Secured.

1 Peter 4:5–6 KJV

Who shall give account to him that is ready to judge the quick and the dead. 

For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.

 • You will not face the Great White Throne.

Revelation 20:11–12 KJV

And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them. 

And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, according to their works.

 • You will face the Bema Seat

1 Corinthians 3:12–14 KJV

Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; 

Every man’s work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man’s work of what sort it is. 

If any man’s work abide which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward.

Sometimes we can be seduced by distorted memories of the past. Like the Israelites who longed for the fleshpots of Egypt, we can sometimes look backward. Live in the New Now! We wasted enough of our bodies souls and time in the corruption of the past. Live in the new now. Our old friends no longer share the same things in common. Live in the new now! We no longer are piling up judgement but are now accruing rewards. Live in the now now!

Armed With The Mind of Christ

Wednesday, September 16th, 2020

Armed With The Mind of Christ

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Submission; Self-denial; Self-control / 1 Peter 4:1–2

The key to success in most things is the proper mindset. In martial arts we are taught that the body will do what the mind will allow. As we try to shine as lights in a very dark world, we are faced with many things that would dim our light. An effective Christian has learned to obtain and maintain the right mindset.  

The Apostle Peter has been telling his sojourners that Jesus is our example. This evening we will learn that in order to effectively glorify God in our lifestyle we must arm ourselves with the mind of Christ.

The Mindset of Christ’s Selflessness.

1 Peter 4:1 KJV

Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

The words “suffered in the flesh” are in the same construction as the similar phrase “being put to death in the flesh” (3:18). In the latter expression we found that Peter was speaking of the fact that our Lord was put to death with respect to the flesh, thus suffering with respect to the flesh. This suffering was the result of unjust treatment. The same holds true in 4:1 where the Christian who has suffered in the flesh is the Christian who has suffered ill-treatment from the persecuting world of sinners. The fact that he has been persecuted is an indication of another fact, namely, that he has ceased from sin. The world directs its persecution against those who are living lives of obedience to God, thus those who have ceased from sin. The verb is passive. Literally, the Christian “hath got release” from sin. God broke the power of sin in his life when He saved him. Thus our reaction to unjust suffering should be that of a saint, not a sinner, since we have in salvation been released from sin’s compelling power.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 110–111.

_______________

Philippians 2:5–8 KJV

Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: 

Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 

But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 

And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.

__________

A.W. Tozer nailed the nail on the head, saying, “In every Christians heart there is a cross and a throne and the Christian is on the throne till he puts himself on the cross; if he refuses the cross he remains on the throne. Perhaps this is at the bottom of the backsliding and worldliness among believers today. We want to be saved but insist Christ do all the dying.”

Arm Yourself With Christ’s Sinlessness.

1 Peter 4:1 KJV

Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

Galatians 5:16–18 KJV

This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh. 

For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh: and these are contrary the one to the other: so that ye cannot do the things that ye would. 

But if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law.

 Finally, the point is that once the Christian grasps this insight he will realize from the example of Christ in 3:18–22 that he must live for God now (which means a suffering in the flesh and thus a battling of sin), for that will lead to a parallel victory (a state of having ceased from sin).1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 149.

Romans 6:6–7 KJV

Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. 

For he that is dead is freed from sin.

A wife came to the conclusion that carbonated drinks were having negative physical effects on her family and herself and so decided that they should give them up. But how would she convince her three-year-old daughter, who liked them so much, that it was necessary to stop drinking them?

As the wife was telling her husband of her decision, the little girl piped up to ask, “Mommy, we don’t like pop any more?” Mommy said “That’s right!”—and that was all it took.

Oh, for such a readiness to give up something when we learn that God does not want us to do it1

1 Michael P. Green, 1500 Illustrations for Biblical Preaching (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2000), 335–336.

Arm Yourself With Christ’s Surrender.

1 Peter 4:2 KJV

That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.

As a result Christians who have adopted Christ’s mind-set have counted themselves dead to sin. They live the rest of their lives not for evil human desires, but rather for the will of God (cf. 2:15; 3:17; 4:19).1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 852.

___________

In this verse, the apostle tells his readers why God breaks the power of the sinful nature at the moment the Christian is saved. It is in order that he should no longer live the rest of his earthly life in the sphere of the cravings (lusts) of men, but live in the sphere of the will of God. The word “lust” in Greek speaks of any strong craving, here, an evil craving.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 111.

_________________

On the other hand, since the flesh is weak and fallen, it is the mode of existence in which the evil impulse in human beings operates. Believers thus have a choice: (1) they can live their remaining time “for human desires,” or (2) they can live it “for the will of God.” The use of “desire” for this generalized “I want” within (“If it feels good, do it”) has already been noted by us earlier in 1 Peter (1:14; 2:11). What is unusual is his use of “human” to mean the same thing as “fleshly” (2:11) or “heathen” (4:3 = “will of the nations”). In other words, “human” means “unredeemed humanity.” Thus there is a clear choice between taking the path of least resistance to their natural desires and their committing themselves to follow God’s will, even if it entails suffering.1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 150.

___________

Andrew Murray put it this way, “Many Christians fear and flee and seek deliverance from all that would humble them. At times they may pray for humility but in their heart of hearts they pray even more to be kept from the things that would bring them to that place.”

Humility results in a life of dying to self which produces radical obedience and reckless abandon.

Jesus was humble and “obedient unto death…”

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 11:58 AM September 16, 2020.

Jesus: The Way To God.

Tuesday, September 8th, 2020

Jesus: The Way to God

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Salvation; Will of God; Preaching; Intercession / 1 Peter 3:18–22

Do you know just how much you are loved? Jesus loves you so much that He provided several ways to reach you and bring you to God. He paid the price for your sin. He reaches out for you through His Word and preaching. He gives you a clean slate by wiping out the old man and making you a new creature. He is constantly praying and interceding for you now. All of this was done in such a way that we could choose to accept Him or choose to reject Him. Jesus is the Door… the only way to God is through Him. If you accept His provisions, the door is open, if not the door to God is closed.

As Peter finishes chapter 3 by encouraging the suffering believers that they are following in the steps of the Savior because He suffered for them, Peter tells us about the different things Jesus did and is doing to bring us to God.  

This passage is one of the most difficult and complicated passages in the Bible. After much study and prayer, I believe we can navigate the deep truths of this text together.

The key is verse 18 to see that all that Jesus did was designed to bring us to God.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

 Christ Brings Us To God Through His Payment

Romans 5:6–8 KJV

For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. 

For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. 

But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

Christ Brings Us To God Through Preaching.

1 Peter 3:19–20 KJV

By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison; 

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.

______

3:19–20. Through whom … He … preached to the spirits in prison has been subject to many interpretations. Some believe Peter here referred to the descent of Christ’s Spirit into hades between His death and resurrection to offer people who lived before the Flood a second chance for salvation. However, this interpretation has no scriptural support.

Others have said this passage refers to Christ’s descent into hell after His crucifixion to proclaim His victory to the imprisoned fallen angels referred to in 2 Peter 2:4–5, equating them with “the sons of God” Moses wrote about (Gen. 6:1–2). Though much commends this view as a possible interpretation, the context seems more likely to be referring to humans rather than angels.

-Bible Knowledge Commentary

_______________________

The “spirits” (pneumasin, a term usually applied to supernatural beings but also used at least once to refer to human “spirits”; cf. Heb. 12:23) are described in 1 Peter 3:20 as those who were disobedient when God waited patiently for Noah to finish building the ark.

Hebrews 12:23 KJV

To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect,

They had rebelled against the message of God during the 120 years the ark was being built. God declared He would not tolerate people’s wickedness forever, but would extend His patience for only 120 more years (Gen. 6:3). Since the entire human race except Noah (Gen. 6:5–9) was evil, God determined to “wipe mankind … from the face of the earth.” The “spirits” referred to in 1 Peter 3:20 are probably the souls of the evil human race that existed in the days of Noah. Those “spirits” are now “in prison” awaiting the final judgment of God at the end of the Age.

Genesis 6:3 KJV

And the LORD said, My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years.

Genesis 6:5–9 KJV

And GOD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. 

And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart. 

And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them. 

But Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD. 

These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God.

The problem remains as to when Christ preached to these “spirits.” Peter’s explanation of the resurrection of Christ (3:18) “by the Spirit” brought to mind that the preincarnate Christ was actually in Noah, ministering through him, by means of the Holy Spirit. Peter (1:11) referred to the “Spirit of Christ” in the Old Testament prophets. Later he described Noah as “a preacher of righteousness” (2 Peter 2:5). The Spirit of Christ preached through Noah to the ungodly humans who, at the time of Peter’s writing, were “spirits in prison” awaiting final judgment.

1 Peter 1:11 KJV

Searching what, or what manner of time the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify, when it testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow.

2 Peter 2:5 KJV

And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;

This interpretation seems to fit the general theme of this section (1 Peter 3:13–22)—keeping a good conscience in unjust persecution. Noah is presented as an example of one who committed himself to a course of action for the sake of a clear conscience before God, though it meant enduring harsh ridicule. Noah did not fear men but obeyed God and proclaimed His message. Noah’s reward for keeping a clear conscience in unjust suffering was the salvation of himself and his family, who were saved through water, V 2, p 852 being brought safely through the Flood.1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 851–852.

_____

It would then be implied here, that though the instrumentality of Noah was employed, yet that it was done not by the Holy Spirit, but by him who afterwards became incarnate. On the supposition, therefore, that this whole passage refers to his preaching to the antediluvians in the time of Noah, and not to the ‘spirits’ after they were confined in prison, this is language which the apostle would have properly and probably used. If that supposition meets the full force of the language, then no argument can be based on it in proof that he went to preach to them after their death, and while his body was lying in the grave.1

1 Albert Barnes, Notes on the New Testament: James to Jude, ed. Robert Frew (London: Blackie & Son, 1884–1885), 177.

_____

When did Christ preach to the spirits in prison? “When once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah.” In Christ’s day, the spirits of those men to whom Noah had preached were in prison, for they had rejected the message of Noah. They had gone into sheol. They were waiting for judgment; they were lost. But Christ did not go down and preach to them after He died on the cross. He preached through Noah “when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah.” For 120 years Noah had preached the Word of God. He saved his family but no one else. It was the Spirit of Christ who spoke through Noah in Noah’s day. In Christ’s day, those who rejected Noah’s message were in prison. The thought is that Christ’s death meant nothing to them just as it means nothing to a great many people today who, as a result, will also come into judgment.1

1 J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible Commentary: The Epistles (1 Peter), electronic ed., vol. 54 (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1991), 76–77.

______________________

Christ Brings Us To God Through Purging

1 Peter 3:20–21 KJV

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water. 

The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ:

Romans 6:3–5 KJV

Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? 

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. 

For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection:

Galatians 3:27 KJV

For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.

_________________

And this (ho, relative pronoun—“water” is the understood antecedent) water symbolizes baptism (baptisma). Baptism represents a complete break with one’s past life. As the Flood wiped away the old sinful world, so baptism pictures one’s break from his old sinful life and his entrance into new life in Christ. Peter now applied to his readers the principle he set forth in verses 13–17 and illustrated in verses 18–20. He exhorted them to have the courage to commit themselves to a course of action by taking a public stand for Christ through baptism. The act of public baptism would “save” them from the temptation to sacrifice their good consciences in order to avoid persecution. For a first-century Christian, baptism meant he was following through on his commitment to Christ, regardless of the consequences.

Baptism does not save from sin, but from a bad conscience. Peter clearly taught that baptism was not merely a ceremonial act of physical purification, but (alla, making a strong contrast) the pledge (eper?t?ma, also trans. “appeal”; cf. nasb) of a good conscience (syneid?se?s; cf. v. 16) toward God. Baptism is the symbol of what has already occurred in the heart and life of one who has trusted Christ as Savior (cf. Rom. 6:3–5; Gal. 3:27; Col. 2:12). To make the source of salvation perfectly clear Peter added, by the resurrection of Jesus Christ (cf. 1 Peter 1:3).1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 852.

Christ Brings Us To God Through Intercessory Prayer

1 Peter 3:22 KJV

Who is gone into heaven, and is on the right hand of God; angels and authorities and powers being made subject unto him.

The first statement is that Jesus “is at the right hand of God.” The root of this statement is in Ps. 110:1, which the early church interpreted christologically. The wording itself is found in Rom. 8:34, and the sense occurs in Acts 2:34; 5:31; Eph. 1:20; Col. 3:1; Heb. 1:3; 8:1; 10:11; 12:2. The meaning of the statement is clear: Jesus now reigns, for he sits in the place of power.

The second statement, “having gone into heaven,” is implied in the first, and it indicates the ascension that followed the resurrection of Jesus. The words also occur in Acts 1:10 in association with other ways of describing the ascension. Peter probably cites the ascension for two reasons: (1) it was traditional to mention it alongside the resurrection (3:18) and the session at God’s right hand, and (2) in ascending Christ passed triumphantly through the sphere of the principalities and powers over which he now reigns.

Thus the third statement declares Christ’s present reign over “angels and authorities and powers.” This is also derived from Ps. 110:1, along with Ps. 8:6, for if Jesus is now seated in the place of power, his enemies must be under his feet.

Romans 8:34 KJV

Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 5:47 PM September 8, 2020.

Essential Truths About Christ’s Suffering

Wednesday, August 19th, 2020


Essential Truths About Christ’s Suffering

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Atonement / 1 Peter 3:18

RECALL NOTICE:

The Maker of all human beings is recalling all units manufactured, regardless of make or year, due to a serious defect in the primary and central component of the heart.

This is due to a malfunction in the original prototype units code named Adam and Eve, resulting in the reproduction of the same defect in all subsequent units.

This defect has been technically termed, “Subsequential Internal Non-morality”, or more commonly known as S.I.N., as it is primarily expressed.

Some other symptoms:

1. Loss of direction

2. Foul vocal emissions

3. Amnesia of origin

4. Lack of peace and joy

5. Selfish, or violent behavior

6. Depression or confusion in the mental component

7. Fearfulness

8. Idolatry

9. Rebellion

The Manufacturer, who is neither liable nor at fault for this defect, is providing factory authorized repair and service free of charge to correct this SIN defect.

The Repair Technician, Jesus, has most generously offered to bear the entire burden of the staggering cost of these repairs. There is no additional fee required.

The number to call for repair in all areas is: P-R-A-Y-E-R. Once connected, please upload your burden of SIN through the REPENTANCE procedure.

Next, download ATONEMENT from the Repair Technician, Jesus, into the heart component.

No matter how big or small the SIN defect is, Jesus will replace it with:

1. Love

2. Joy

3. Peace

4. Patience

5. Kindness

6. Goodness

7. Faithfulness

8. Gentleness

9. Self control

Please see the operating manual, the B.I.B.L.E. (Believers Instructions Before Leaving Earth), for further details on the use of these fixes.

WARNING: Continuing to operate the human being unit without correction voids any manufacturer warranties, exposing the unit to dangers and problems too numerous to list and will result in the human unit being permanently impounded. For free emergency service, call on JESUS.

DANGER: The human being units not responding to this recall action will have to be scrapped in the furnace. The SIN defect will not be permitted to enter Heaven so as to prevent contamination of that facility.

Thank you for your immediate attention.

__________________

While The Apostle Peter was addressing the suffering and displaced pilgrims, he encouraged them to look at Jesus as one that suffered not for the bad, but in spite of being good.  

In our text verse we have the meat of the Gospel. Mankind is does have a defective flaw and Jesus’ suffering was used to repair that flaw. Tonight we will see truths about Jesus’ suffering that will not only show us His love for us, but also will show us how we can view our own sufferings when we suffer for righteousness’ sake.

Christ Suffered Once

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

One transaction that settled the account.

Romans 6:10 KJV

For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.

Romans 8:3 KJV

For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:

Perpetual Suffering of Christ is not a Biblical concept.

Hebrews 7:27 KJV

Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people’s: for this he did once, when he offered up himself.

Isaiah 53:11 KJV

He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: By his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; For he shall bear their iniquities.

Christ was not just another sacrifice but it was THE sacrifice.

Hebrews 9:26 KJV

For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.

Hebrews 9:28 KJV

So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.

Christ the Righteous, suffered for Man the Sinner.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

Romans 5:8 KJV

But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

2 Corinthians 5:21 KJV

For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

Romans 3:21–24 KJV

But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; 

Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference: 

For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; 

Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:

Christ’s Suffering was to Lead us to God.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

Romans 5:1 KJV

Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:

Ephesians 2:18 KJV

For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.

Ephesians 3:12 KJV

In whom we have boldness and access with confidence by the faith of him.

Christ’s Suffering was Temporary, His Victory is Eternal.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

John 6:63 KJV

It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life.

Romans 8:11 KJV

But if the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you.

1 Corinthians 15:22 KJV

For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 6:08 PM August 19, 2020.

Be All You Can Be EVEN in 2020

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2020

Be All You Can Be in 2020

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Testimony; A Witness; Evangelism / 1 Peter 3:13–17

It is easy to lose hope and focus in the tumult that is life in 2020. We learned last week however, that it is possible to love life and see good days even now. The secret it good clean living. Seek peace, avoid evil and know God hears our prayers. This evening we are going to continue to discover Peter’s advice to the weary sojourners. Now that we have discovered that living a life we love and seeing good days is actually possible, how can we use this knowledge to help us live up to our potential? This evening we will discover three truths that will help us be all we can be EVEN in 2020.

Be Good

1 Peter 3:13 KJV

And who is he that will harm you, if ye be followers of that which is good?

The word “and” is, “seeing that God takes such good care of the righteous,” who is he that will harm you? This question was asked in view of the persecution and suffering through which these saints were going. Peter tells them that as a result of their righteous lives and God’s care, their blessedness will be such as to turn off all the malice of their persecutors and make their suffering itself to be a joy. The word “followers” is the translation of a Greek word meaning “zealots.” The verb means “to burn with zeal, to desire earnestly.”1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 87.

Proverbs 16:7 KJV

When a man’s ways please the LORD, He maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him.

Romans 8:31–33 KJV

What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us? 

He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things? 

Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God’s elect? It is God that justifieth.

Be Confident

1 Peter 3:14 KJV

But and if ye suffer for righteousness’ sake, happy are ye: and be not afraid of their terror, neither be troubled;

For even if suffering should occur, Christians are blessed and thus should not be frightened. The word here translated “blessed” (makarioi; cf. 4:14) was used by Jesus (Matt. 5:3–11). To be “blessed” in this context does not mean to “feel delighted” but to be “highly privileged.” 

Matthew 5:10–12 KJV

Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. 

Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Be Ready With An Answer.

Not only were these Christian Jews to find a refuge in Christ Jesus as they set Him apart as Lord of their lives, but they were to be ready to give an answer to these persecutors who attacked them and the Word of God which they believed. The words “give an answer” are the translation of a Greek word used as a legal term in the courts. It means literally “to talk off from,” and was used of an attorney who talked his client off from a charge preferred against him. He presented a verbal defense. The exhortation is to Christians to talk the Bible off from the charges preferred against it, thus presenting for it a verbal defense. Today, Modernism has preferred charges against the Word of God, has placed it in the dungeons of the destructive critic’s inquisition, and has charged it with gross errors, and with being man-made. It is not allowed to speak for itself except through the prosecuting attorney, the destructive critic. But those who believe in a whole Bible, rather than a Bible full of holes, are admonished not to remain silent in the face of this attack by Modernism, but to defend the Bible against these false charges by presenting a verbal defense for it, refuting the statements of the destructive critic.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 89.

Psalm 119:46 KJV

I will speak of thy testimonies also before kings, And will not be ashamed.

Colossians 4:6 KJV

Let your speech be alway with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man.

Be Blameless

1 Peter 3:16–17 KJV

Having a good conscience; that, whereas they speak evil of you, as of evildoers, they may be ashamed that falsely accuse your good conversation in Christ. 

For it is better, if the will of God be so, that ye suffer for well doing, than for evil doing.

A believer’s testimony should not be given in an arrogant manner but with gentleness and respect. (“Respect” here is from phobos, “fear,” whereas “respect” for one’s wife [v. 7] is tim?, “honor.”) Christians who are not afraid in the face of persecution are able to witness respectfully to their faith in Christ. They then keep a clear (agath?n, “good”) conscience (syneid?sin; cf. 2:19; 3:21). Peter may have been alluding to the occasion when he denied Christ out of fear, in words that were neither gentle nor respectful.

Christians who suffer unjustly and keep a clear conscience put to shame those who slander their good behavior in Christ. Once again Peter encouraged his readers with the fact that good behavior is their best defense against unjust punishment and persecution.1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 850.

____________________

An all-time favorite Bible teacher was Don Wilton. One day in class, Dr. Wilton told us about getting to serve on Billy Graham’s team for a crusade in Korea. Dr. Wilton told about sitting on the platform one night during the invitation, — right next to Billy Graham.

Dr. Wilton couldn’t help notice that during the invitation, Billy Graham started looking down at his fingernails. And he thought, “I can’t believe Dr. Graham is so unconcerned about this invitation that he would be studying his nails!”

Don was getting a little huffy on the inside, if you know what I mean. But just then, Billy Graham pointed to one of the Korean ladies who had come forward to talk to the counselors. And Billy said, “Do you see that lady? — She did my nails today, and I was able to lead her to the Lord.”

That’s the spirit and habit we need! — Looking for opportunities to tell more people about Jesus. It can help them for all eternity, and it can lighten our burden along the way.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 12:02 PM July 22, 2020.

Loving Life in 2020

Wednesday, July 15th, 2020

Loving Life in 2020

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Unity of Humanity; Peace / 1 Peter 3:8–11

1 Peter 3:10 KJV
For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile:

How is it going this evening? Do and suffering through your days. The Apostle Peter in our passage is writing to people who are suffering persecution for the cause of Christ. Many people who read this epistle were imprisoned for their faith. In spite of these circumstances, Peter told them that it was possible to love life and see good days. The truths Peter taught then still stand today. May God help you to adjust your thinking as you learn how to love the life that you live.

Seek the Truth

The wisdom of God found in His Word.

Proverbs 3:13–18 KJV
Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, And the man that getteth understanding.

For the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver, And the gain thereof than fine gold.

She is more precious than rubies: And all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her.

Length of days is in her right hand; And in her left hand riches and honour.

Her ways are ways of pleasantness, And all her paths are peace.

She is a tree of life to them that lay hold upon her: And happy is every one that retaineth her.

1. Brings happiness


2. Has great value


3. Tends to a long life


4. Brings pleasantness


5. Brings peace

B. The Wisdom of your parents

Proverbs 3:1–2 KJV
My son, forget not my law; But let thine heart keep my commandments:

For length of days, and long life, And peace, shall they add to thee.

Proverbs 4:20–22 KJV
My son, attend to my words; Incline thine ear unto my sayings.

Let them not depart from thine eyes; Keep them in the midst of thine heart.

For they are life unto those that find them, And health to all their flesh.

Seek Unity

1 Peter 3:8 KJV
Finally, be ye all of one mind, having compassion one of another, love as brethren, be pitiful, be courteous:

Be of one mind – homophron = of the same mind.

Romans 12:16 KJV
Be of the same mind one toward another. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate. Be not wise in your own conceits.

Share the same compassion one for another – sumpathes =suffering along with

Romans 12:15 KJV
Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.

Love as brethren

1 Corinthians 1:10 KJV
Now I beseech you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you; but that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment.

1 John 3:14 KJV
We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death.

Be pitiful = tenderhearted – of good heartedness

Courteous – philophron = friendly of mind

Ephesians 4:31–32 KJV
Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:

And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.

Seek Peace

1000 Illustrations for Preaching & Teaching Perfect Peace

John Henry Newman wrote perceptively: “ ‘These things write we unto you, that your joy may be full.’ What is fulness of joy but peace? Joy is tumultuous only when it is not full; but peace is the privilege of those who are ‘filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea.’ ‘Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee, because he trusteth in Thee.’ ”

Practice payback Jesus style.

1 Peter 3:9 KJV
Not rendering evil for evil, or railing for railing: but contrariwise blessing; knowing that ye are thereunto called, that ye should inherit a blessing.

  1. Not evil for evil

Proverbs 20:22 KJV 1900

Say not thou, I will recompense evil;

But wait on the Lord, and he shall save thee.

  1. Not railing for railing = insults
  2. Give blessing in the place of evil or railing

Romans 12:19–21 KJV
Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.

Therefore if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink: for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head.

Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.

  1. This is your calling.

2 Corinthians 5:20 KJV
Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us: we pray you in Christ’s stead, be ye reconciled to God.

Avoid verbal payback

1 Peter 3:10 KJV
For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile:

Matthew 5:38–39 KJV
Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth:

But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also.

Eschew evil = turn away from on purpose by doing good instead.

1 Peter 3:11 KJV
Let him eschew evil, and do good; let him seek peace, and ensue it.

Seek peace

James 3:18 KJV
And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace of them that make peace.

  1. Avoid conflict as much as possible.
  2. Do not replace expressed anger with silent bitterness.

E. Keep an open line with God.

1 Peter 3:12 KJV
For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open unto their prayers: but the face of the Lord is against them that do evil.

1000 Illustrations for Preaching & Teaching Personal Peace

Peace is far more than protection from annihilation. Peace is more than the cessation of hostilities. Peace is more than a state of mind or the tranquility of a countryside. Peace is commitment to a way of life which precludes war, poverty, slavery, prejudice, and fear. Peace is action. Peace is the fruit of love.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 10:59 AM July 15, 2020.

Enduring Beauty

Wednesday, July 1st, 2020

Enduring Beauty

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Beauty; Submission / 1 Peter 3:3–6

A few years ago when a pastor lived in Poland we were at a local museum which had a beautiful sculpture of Mary holding Jesus. For years it stood on a street corner before the city decided to clean it up and restore it. Up to that point no one thought it was anything special but as they began to work on it the restorers discovered that it had been repainted 27 times and under those many layers was discovered a priceless masterpiece from the middle ages. The paint had covered its beauty.

Last week we saw that wives can win over disobedient husbands not by their nagging, but by their submissive lifestyle. Tonight we will discuss the other way that ladies win over men, their beauty.

It has been said that beauty is skin deep but ugly goes right to the bone. Tonight we will discover the kind of lasting beauty that wins hearts and does not fade away with age or familiarity.

True Beauty Does Not Focus Appearance.

1 Peter 3:3 KJV
Whose adorning let it not be that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel;

The word “adornment” is the translation of the Greek word kosmos (??????) which was used in classical Greek to refer to the adornment or the ornaments worn by women. The word in itself refers to an ordered system, namely, a system where order prevails. The word in the Greek opposite in meaning to kosmos (??????) is chaos (????), which comes into English in the word “chaos,” and which means “a rude unformed mass.” Kosmos (??????) is used in the New Testament to refer to the original, perfect creation, a system where order prevailed. Here the word refers to the adornment of the woman, and the genius of the word speaks of the fact that that adornment should be that which is fitting, congruous, not diverse from one’s character. That is, the adornment of the Christian woman should be in keeping with what she is as a Christian.

• This does not forbid hairstyles, jewelry, or fashion, it warns about focusing on such things.

Oftentimes under silken apparel, there is a threadbare soul.—Thomas Watson

True Beauty Starts on the Inside.

1 Peter 3:4 KJV
But let it be the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.

Peter, however, is not simply interested in telling women what not to pay attention to. His focus is positive: Virtue is one garment that any Christian woman can wear with pride. It is the “hidden inner self” that bears the Christian character and expresses itself through the body. This awkward expression (hence the number of ways it is translated) comes close to the atmosphere of some sayings of Jesus (Matt. 15:8, 18; cf. the stress on the hidden, Matt. 6:3–4), as well as Paul’s inner man-outer man distinction (Rom. 7:20–22; 2 Cor. 4:16). It is this true self, the self of the heart, whose clothing is important. This clothing, in contrast to bodily clothing, is imperishable and therefore of utmost importance.1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 118.

Matthew 15:8 KJV
This people draweth nigh unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lips; but their heart is far from me.

• Inner beauty can last unlike the external stuff.

Psalm 104:2 KJV
Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment: Who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain:

The principle to the effect that adornment should proceed from within and be truly representative of the inner being is the principle upon which God operates. It is said of God, “Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment” (Psalm 104:2). But this light comes from the inmost being of God and is an expression of His intrinsic essence. The light that caused our Lord’s face and garments to shine with a heavenly radiance in the Transfiguration (Matt. 17:2), came, as the Greek verb indicates, from His inmost being.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997

The virtues that characterize this spirit are gentleness and peacefulness or tranquility. “Gentle” in the Greek world was an amiable friendliness that contrasted with roughness, bad temper, or brusqueness. It was a virtue especially prized in women. In biblical perspective the term indicates a person who does not attack back, for he or she waits on God to judge in the end; knowing God is just, the person can suffer evil without bitterness and vengeance (Num. 12:3; Matt. 5:5; 11:29). Thus in Peter’s eyes the valued character of the Greeks has a transcendent basis in God1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 119.

  This fits with “peaceful,” a term used in the NT only here and in 1 Tim. 2:2, the nominal form appearing as well in Acts 22:2; 2 Thess. 3:12; and 1 Tim. 2:11, 12. The sense of being calm, peaceful, and tranquil as opposed to restless, rebellious, disturbed, or insubordinate appears in each passage. It fits well with “gentle” and underlines its meaning. Both 1 Clem. 13:4 and Barn. 19:4 use the two terms together, taking them from a version of Isa. 66:2, “On whom shall I look, but on the meek and gentle and him who trembles at my oracles.” Furthermore, together they form the ideal response to slander by husbands and others.

True Beauty is Seen In Biblical Role Models

1 Peter 3:5–6 KJV
For after this manner in the old time the holy women also, who trusted in God, adorned themselves, being in subjection unto their own husbands:

Even as Sara obeyed Abraham, calling him lord: whose daughters ye are, as long as ye do well, and are not afraid with any amazement.

…as long as you are not afraid with any amazement (???)

To the moral characteristics of Sarah Peter adds “do not fear any intimidation,” perhaps from Prov. 3:25 (in the LXX it uses two of the same Greek words). Here is the other side of subordination. These women’s husbands surely did not like their going to Christian meetings and refusing to worship the family gods. All types of intimidation—physical, emotional, social—would be used to force them back in line with the husband’s religious beliefs. While calling for gentleness and inner tranquility overall and subordination to their husbands in all areas indifferent to their Christian faith, he encourages them to stand firm in the light of their hope in the coming Christ and quietly refuse to bow to the threats and punishments of their husbands. They are subordinate, but their subordination is revolutionary in that they are subordinate not out of fear or desire for social position or other human advantage but out of obedience to Christ, who treats them as full persons and allows them to rise above the threats and fears of this age.1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 121.

The gods we worship write their names on our faces.—Ralph Waldo Emerson1

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 12:44 PM July 1, 2020.

Silent Soul Winning

Wednesday, June 24th, 2020

Silent Soul Winning

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Submission; Testimony / 1 Peter 3:1

Through the years, I’ve heard people say, “I wasn’t looking for God when He found me.” Let me give you a modern example of this process.

Astronaut Charles Duke is one of only twelve men who have left footprints on the moon. He was the lunar module pilot for the Apollo 16 Mission. He now lives in New Braunfels, Texas. He wasn’t a Christian when he walked on the moon. Here’s his story:

“After walking on the moon, I was bored. Fame, fortune, a spot in the history books: I had it all. But if you had been a fly on the wall in my home, you would have seen that I wasn’t so hot. I was failing miserably as a husband and father. Though I had gone to church all my life, I had all of God I needed in that one hour every Sunday morning. Even the moon had not been a spiritual experience. I wasn’t looking for God. I only knew Jesus the way you know the U.S. Presidents–in name only. My business succeeded, and the money rolled in, but I was bored again.

“But Dottie wasn’t. She had changed. Her depression had lifted, and she demonstrated a new, believing faith. She turned to God–not me–for answers to her problems. One night I attended a Bible Study with her that focused on one penetrating question, ‘Who was Jesus?’ All my life I had said the words ‘Son of God’ but had never trusted Him. That night I came face-to-face with the opportunity to follow Him. I prayed with Dottie in the front seat of our car and gave my life over to Christ. I didn’t see angels. I didn’t hear music. No blinding lights. But I knew what I knew. It was real.

The next day I awoke with an insatiable desire to read the Bible. It cost the government $400 million for me to walk three days on the moon–and it’s over. But to walk with Jesus is free and it lasts forever!”

Last week we saw a strange place from which the light of the Gospel could shine… from the life of a Christian slave. We saw that if a believer lives his life in a Godly manner, even though he is a lowly slave, his powerful life will silence accusers and bring glory to Jesus.

Peter now addresses the sojourners and their domestic relationships. The culture of the time was that women simply followed the religion of their husband, and had no say or right to say what they believed personally. Peter introduces a radical concept for the time. He proposes that women can believe something different than their husbands, because they have value as an individual with separate thoughts and convictions, and those beliefs have value. So how in the world can a woman reach her unbelieving or at least disobedient husband without turning him off completely to her new found faith? Peter gives the answer… it is to learn the art of Silent Soul Winning.

Submitting In Love Is The Right Thing to Do.

1 Peter 3:1 KJV

Likewise, ye wives, be in subjection to your own husbands; that, if any obey not the word, they also may without the word be won by the conversation of the wives;

Ephesians 5:21–22 KJV

Submitting yourselves one to another in the fear of God. 

Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord.

Colossians 3:18 KJV

Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as it is fit in the Lord.

Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words Subject, Subjection

hupotasso (????????, 5293), primarily a military term, “to rank under” (hupo, “under,” tasso, “to arrange”),

Submission is the Wise Thing to Do.

…they also may without the word be won by the conversation of the wives

Proverbs 11:30 KJV

The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life; And he that winneth souls is wise.

The word translated “if” in the Greek text refers to a fulfilled condition. The word “even” in the Greek text is not brought out by the translators. It is, “even if.” “Obey not” is the translation of a word which speaks of a state of unbelieving disobedience. The word means literally in its verb form, “not to allow one’s self to be persuaded.” 

These husbands were of that obstinate, non-persuasable type that will not listen to reason. Their wives had often given them the gospel, but they had met it with stiff-necked obstinacy. Peter exhorts them, in view of their husbands’ obstinate rejection of the gospel, to stop talking about it, and just live a Christlike life before them.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 72.

___

The word “won” in the Greek text means “to gain, acquire,” in the sense of the acquisition of money in James 4:13, here, “to gain” anyone by winning him over to the kingdom of God. “A soul won is a gain to our Lord who bought him, a gain to the one who won him, and a gain to that soul itself.”

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 73.

Submission is the Silent But Effective Thing to Do.

1 Peter 3:2 KJV

While they behold your chaste conversation coupled with fear.

The husbands in question “do not believe the word,” for their wives had certainly tried to explain their new faith to them and some husbands probably would have visited their wives’ church to see what was going on. Since these men had not accepted the gospel, they were likely discouraging their wives’ dedication to Christ and attendance at Christian activities, especially when they discovered that the women no longer accepted their household religion. Peter does not suggest that the women should give in to their husbands and discontinue Christian activities, but that they should not allow their freedom in Christ and domestic discomfort (with some understandable hurt and anger) to make them feel superior to their husbands and obey them less. Instead they are to be model wives. This seeking to please is far more likely to win their husbands over than continual nagging. It will also commend Christianity to the wider society. The term “win” is a commercial term meaning “to get commercial gain” or “to win something,” but in Christian usage it is a missionary term meaning “to make a Christian” and is used in parallel with “save” in 1 Cor. 9:19–22. 1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 116.

_____

The word “conversation” today refers to the interchange of language between two or more persons. When the a.v. was translated it meant what the Greek word means, “one’s behaviour, manner of life.” Thus do some English words change their meaning in the course of time. This manner of life included in it submissiveness to their husbands. Both Peter and Paul found it necessary to impress upon the Church that incompatibility of religion did not justify dissolution of marriage. This subjection to their husbands would also be a factor which God could use in winning their husbands.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 73.

___

Jill Briscoe talks about the difference between her family and her husband, Stuart’s, family and what that brought to their own marriage. She says, “My father, a quiet, gentle man, considered himself head of his home: protector, defender, and provider. My mom was a sweet, Scottish-born Presbyterian. She believed in the sovereignty of God and her husband. My father adored my mother, put his considerable business assets into her name, and looked to her to raise the children. When my sister came of age, my father supported her when she became an excellent car mechanic and raced cars. Eventually she took her place at his side as partner in his successful car business.

“Stuart’s family was strict, conservative evangelical. His father was an elder in a small local assembly of believers, and he took seriously his responsibility to rule the household well. He considered himself the authority in his family, while his wife, a bright, articulate, efficient lady, considered herself in subjection to her husband in everything, carrying those convictions to her dress, her hair style, and silence in the presence of men at the church.

“Newly converted at a college in Cambridge and having just been introduced to Stuart’s family,” Jill says, “I remember wondering greatly about this amazing mode of doing things. I sensed an unconscious frustration of unexplored desires and frustrated gifts in my mother-in-law. It was as if those gifts sat meekly inside her heart with eyes downcast and wearing a hat.

“In that moment as a new believer,” Jill says, “I believe I stumbled on an important truth of what submission isn’t. Submission isn’t sitting down on the outside while you’re standing up on the inside.”

(Source: Jill Briscoe, “Hilarious Hupotasso,” Preaching Today, Tape No.117. From a sermon by C. Philip Green, Grace at Home–Part I, 6/11/2011)

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:48 PM June 24, 2020.

That We Should Live

Wednesday, June 17th, 2020

That We Should Live

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Salvation; Sanctification; Restoration / 1 Peter 2:24–25

The story has been told of a farmer who was trying to teach his son how to plow a straight furrow. After the horse had been hitched up and everything was ready, he told the boy to keep an eye on some object at the other end of the field and aim straight toward it. “Do you see that cow lying down over there?” he asked. “Keep your eye on her and plow straight ahead.”

The boy started plowing and the farmer went about his chores. When he returned a little later to see what progress had been made, he was shocked to find, instead of a straight row, something that looked more like a question mark. The boy had obeyed his instruction. The trouble was, the cow had moved!

Jesus is an object that will not move. He is the foundation of our faith, the faithful Rock who never moves, never changes in his love for believers. We can be sure that if we set our eyes on him, our path will be straight!133

Peter had been telling these first century Pilgrims that they need to follow Christ’s example of submission to suffering. Tonight we are reminded what the Cross was all about. Jesus told us that He came, not only to save us from death, but also to give us Abundant Life.

John 10:10 KJV

The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.

So, capitalizing on that truth and reflecting on truths learned from the Messianic passage of Isaiah 53, Peter shows us that Christ suffered and died, not just so that we don’t die… So That We Should Live.

Jesus Physically Bore Our Sins.

1 Peter 2:24 KJV

Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.

The word “bare” is the translation of a word used in the LXX, of the priest carrying the sacrifice up to the altar. The brazen altar was four and one-half feet high, and was approached by an incline up which the priest bore the sacrifice.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 68.

2 Corinthians 5:21 KJV

For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

Hebrews 9:28 KJV

So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.

Isaiah 53:12 KJV

Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, And he shall divide the spoil with the strong; Because he hath poured out his soul unto death: And he was numbered with the transgressors; And he bare the sin of many, And made intercession for the transgressors.

Jesus Died So That We Can Live

that we, being dead to sins, should live

Live Being Made Alive to Righteousness

1 Corinthians 2:14 KJV

But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.

We are dead to sin

Romans 6:1–2 KJV

What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 

God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?

Romans 7:4 KJV

Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God.

2 Corinthians 5:14–15 KJV

For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead: 

And that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again.

Galatians 2:19 KJV

For I through the law am dead to the law, that I might live unto God.

Galatians 2:20 KJV

I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.

Live Being Healed By His Stripes.

1 Peter 2:24 KJV

Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.

The blood of Christ heals our sin in that He by one offering put away sin forever. There is no room here for the healing of illness through the blood of Jesus. The Cross was a purely judicial matter. One goes to a hospital when one is ill, and to a law court to take care of legal matters. In the great law court of the universe, the Judge offers mercy on the basis of justice satisfied at the Cross. The matter of bodily illness is not mentioned in the context. -Wuest

Isaiah 53:5 KJV

But he was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities: The chastisement of our peace was upon him; And with his stripes we are healed.

Cliff Barrows tells of the time his two young children did something wrong. Although they were gently warned, they repeated the offense and needed to be disciplined. Cliff’s tender heart was pained at the thought of having to punish the ones he loved.

So he called Bobby and Bettie into his room, removed his belt bare back he knelt by his bed. He told each child to whip him ten times. Oh, how they cried! But the penalty had to be paid. The children sobbed as they lashed their daddy’s back. Then Cliff hugged and kissed them, and they prayed together. “It hurt,” he recalls, “but I never had to spank them again.”

Are you haunted by the memory of some cowardly, selfish, or shameful acts? Jesus took the lashes for all our sins. Now He invites us to accept His forgiveness and devote the rest of our lives to Him. He wants us to know the greatness of His Father’s love. That’s why He died! God the Judge not only declared us guilty, but also paid our penalty (1 Pet. 2:24).

(Source: from a sermon by Dennis Davidson, “Punished for You and Me” 7/14/08, SermonCentral.com)

Live Having Been Returned to the Care of the Good Shepherd.

1 Peter 2:25 KJV

For ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls.

Psalm 23:1 KJV

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.

John 10:11 KJV

I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.

John 10:14 KJV

I am the good shepherd, and know my sheep, and am known of mine.

John 10:27–30 KJV

My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: 

And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand. 

My Father, which gave them me, is greater than all; and no man is able to pluck them out of my Father’s hand. 

I and my Father are one.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 12:25 PM June 17, 2020.

In His Steps

Wednesday, June 10th, 2020

In His Steps

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Discipleship; Follow Christ / 1 Peter 2:21–23

 This past week, Josie received a rather interesting story via the e-mail that I would like to paraphrase for you this morning. Unfortunately, I do not know the name of the author. However, I do know that it was written by one of the students who witnessed this experiential sermon in a small Christian college, somewhere in the western United States. It happened during an introductory course in Christian theology. The professor who taught this course was named Dr. Christianson.

Every student was required to take this course his or her freshman year, regardless of their major. Although Dr. Christianson tried hard to communicate the essence of the Gospel to his class, he found that most of his students looked upon the course as nothing but required drudgery. Despite his best efforts, most students refused to take the course, and subsequently, Christianity seriously.

There was, however, one special student in his class. Steve had entered college with the intent of later going on to seminary to study for the ordained ministry, and so he took this course seriously. Steve was also popular among the student body. He was not only well liked, he was an imposing physical specimen. Even as a freshman, he was the starting center on the school football team.

One day, Dr. Christianson asked Steve to remain after class in order to talk with him. Dr. Christianson then asked Steve, “How many push-ups can you do?”

Steve responded, “I do about 200 every night.”

“Well, that pretty good, Steve,” Dr. Christianson responded. Then he asked “Do you think you could do 300?”

“I don’t know,” Steve answered. “I’ve never done 300 at a time.”

“Can you do 300 in sets of 10? I have a class project in mind and I need you to do about 300 push-ups in sets of ten for this to work. Can you do it,” the professor asked.

Steve said, “Well… I think I can… Yeah, I can do it.” Dr. Christianson said, “Good. I need you to do this on Friday. Let me explain what I have in mind.”

Friday came and Steve got to class early and sat in the front of the room. When class started the professor pulled out a huge box of donuts. Now, these weren’t the normal kind of donuts. They were the extra fancy, BIG kind, with cream centers and frosting. Everyone in the class became excited. It was Friday, the last class of the day, and it looked as though they were going to get an early start on the weekend with a party in Dr. Christianson’s class.

Dr. Christianson then went to the first girl in the first row and asked, “Cynthia, do you want to have one of these donuts?” “Yes,” she replied.

Dr. Christianson then turned to Steve and asked, “Steve, would you do ten push-ups so that Cynthia can have a donut?”

“Sure,” Steve said, as he jumped down to the floor in front of his desk and did a quick ten. Then he returned to his seat. Dr. Christianson then put a donut on Cynthia’s desk, and went to the next person in the row and asked, “Joe, would you like a donut?”

Joe said “Yes.” And again, Dr. Christianson asked, “Steve, would you do ten push-ups so that Joe can have a donut?” And again, Steve hit the floor and did a quick ten. And so it went, down the first row of students. Steve did ten push-ups for every person before they got their donut.

Then Dr. Christianson started down the second row, and came to Scott. Scott was on the basketball team, and an athlete in his own right. When Scott was asked if he wanted a donut, he responded by saying, “Well, can I do my own push-ups?” Dr. Christianson responded, “No. Steve has to do them.” Scott then said, “Then I don’t want one.”

Dr. Christianson shrugged his shoulders, turned to Steve, and asked, “Steve, would you do ten push-ups so Scott can have a donut that he doesn’t want?” And in obedience, Steve started to do ten push-ups. Scott then said, “Hey, I said I didn’t want one.”

Dr. Christianson retorted, “Look, this is my classroom, my class, and my donuts. Just leave it on the desk if you don’t want it.” And he put a donut on Scott’s desk.

By this time, Steve had begun to slow down. He just stayed on the floor between sets, because it took too much effort to be getting up and down. You could start to see perspiration coming out around his brow. And as Dr. Christianson started down the third row, the students were beginning to get angry. “Jenny, do you want a donut?” he asked. And as sternly as she could, she said “No.” But again, Steve did ten for the donut that Jenny didn’t want.

By now, a growing sense of uneasiness filled the room. The students were all beginning to say “No,” and there were all these uneaten donuts on the desks. Steve also had to really put forth a lot of extra effort to get his push-ups done for each donut. A small pool of sweat formed on the floor from beneath his face. The class could clearly see that his arms and brow were red from the physical effort involved.

Dr. Christianson started down the fourth row. During his class, however, some other students from other classes had wandered in and sat on the steps along the side wall of the classroom. When the professor realized this, he did a quick count, and realized that there were now 35 students in the room. He began to worry if Steve would be able to make it, because it was taking him much longer to complete each set.

When he came to the end of the last row, he asked Steve, “Do you think we should give a donut to these five, who are not members of our class? You realize that if we do, you will need to do ten push-ups for each one.

Steve picked up his head, his arms now visibly shaking from exhaustion, and said, “Give them a donut. But do I have to touch my nose to the floor on each push-up?” Dr. Christianson thought for a moment and said, “Well, they’re your push-ups. You are in charge now. You can do them any way you want.”

As Dr. Christianson went to those last few students, the tone in the voices had changed from defiance, and anger, to sadness and compassion – the next to last student very sadly uttering, “No, thank you.” Again, Dr. Christianson quietly asked “Steve, would you do ten push-ups so that Linda can have a donut she doesn’t want?” Grunting from the effort, Steve did ten, very slow push-ups for Linda.

Then he stood before the last student, and asked, “Susan, do you want a donut?” With tears flowing down her face, she asked, “Dr. Christianson, why can’t I help him? Dr. Christianson responded, with tears of his own, “No, Steve has to do it alone. I have given him the task and he is in charge of seeing that everyone has an opportunity for a donut, whether they want it or not.

When I decided to have this party, I looked at my grade book. Steve is the only one with a perfect grade. Everyone else has either failed a class, skipped a class, or offered me inferior work. Steve shared with me that in football practice, when a player messes up, he has to do push-ups. I then told Steve that none of you could come to my party unless he paid the consequences for you, by doing your push-ups. He and I made a deal for your sakes.

Then he added, “Steve, would you do ten push-ups so Susan can have a donut?” As Steve very slowly finished his last push-up, his arms buckled beneath him, and he fell to the floor. Two students helped an exhausted Steve to a seat.

Dr. Christianson then turned to his class and said, “My wish is that you might understand and fully comprehend all the riches of grace and mercy that have been given to you through the sacrifice of our Lord, Jesus the Christ, who gave himself up for us all. Whether or not we choose to accept his gift to us, the price has been paid. Wouldn’t it be foolish and ungrateful, to leave it lying on your desk?”

As Christians, little Christs, we are called to emulate the selfless lifestyle of our Savior. The next time you feel taken advantage of or put upon, think that we are called to follow in His steps.

Christ is Our Example

1 Peter 1:21 KJV

Who by him do believe in God, that raised him up from the dead, and gave him glory; that your faith and hope might be in God.

“Hereunto” is literally “into this” namely, the endurance of wrongful sufferings. The divine call of God to a lost sinner is an effectual call into salvation, and an accompaniment of that salvation is suffering for righteousness’ sake, the natural result of the Christian’s contact with the people of the world and their reaction towards the Lord Jesus who is seen in the life of the saint.

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 66.

Philippians 1:29 KJV

For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake;

An example (??????????). Only here in the New Testament. A graphic word, meaning a copy set by writing-masters for their pupils. Some explain it as a copy of characters over which the student is to trace the lines.1

1 Marvin Richardson Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament, vol. 1 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887), 648.

________________

The term for “example” is not simply that of a good example that one is exhorted to copy, but the pattern letters that a school child must carefully trace if he or she will ever learn to write. As if to underline this point Peter adds that we are to “follow in his footsteps.” This call to follow Christ is a powerful image. M. Hengel, in commenting on Jesus’ use of the term “follow,” which is surely reflected by Peter, points out, “ ‘Following’ means in the first place unconditional sharing of the master’s destiny, which does not stop even at deprivation and suffering in the train of the master, and is possible only on the basis of complete trust on the part of the person who ‘follows’; he has placed his destiny and his future in his master’s hands.” Peter underlines this with “in his footsteps,” an expression that is found only here in the NT and that means the footprints of a human or the spoor of an animal (cf. Sir. 14:22; 50:29, applied to Wisdom). Thus we are like a child placing foot after foot into the prints of his father in the snow, following a sure trail broken for him. But this trail of Christ includes suffering, not for our sins (he has already suffered “on your behalf” in that respect), but as part of the pattern of life to which he has called us.1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 109–110.

________________

It is reported that St. Wenceslaus, King of Bohmia, one winters night, going to his devotions in the snow barefooted, his servant, who endeavoured to imitate his master’s piety, began to faint, through the inclemency of the weather, till the king commanded him to follow him, and to set his feet in the same footsteps which his feet should mark for him.

So does Jesus command us to mark His footsteps; for He has trodden down difficulties, and made the way easier and fit for our feet by the argument of His own example.

Christ Did No Sin

1 Peter 2:22 KJV

Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:

2 Corinthians 5:21 KJV

For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

Hebrews 4:15 KJV

For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.

1 John 3:5 KJV

And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins; and in him is no sin.

The Greek word for “guile” is the same one found in 2:1, which verse please consult for full treatment of the word. The word speaks of craftiness or trickery. 

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 67.

Christ Lived What He Preached

1 Peter 2:23 KJV

Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously:

Matthew 5:43–45 KJV

Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy. 

But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; 

That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.

The Greek word translated “revile,” Calvin defines as follows, “It is a harsher railing, which not only rebukes a man but also sharply bites him, and stamps him with open contumely. It is to wound a man with an accursed sting.” Thus was the tender heart of the Lord Jesus wounded by totally depraved human nature.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 67–68.

Christ Was Totally Submitted to the Father’s Will.

1 Peter 2:23 KJV

Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously:

The word “committed” is the translation of a Greek word which means literally “to hand over.” It means “to deliver something to someone to keep, use, take care of, manage.” Our Lord kept on delivering over to God the Father both the revilers and their revilings as both kept on wounding His loving heart. It is for us to do the same thing when men revile us because of our Christian testimony.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 68.

2 Timothy 1:12 KJV

For the which cause I also suffer these things: nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:08 PM June 10, 2020.