Archive for the ‘Wednesday Evening Sermons’ Category

Resist The Devil

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2020

Resist The Devil

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Temptation; Spiritual Warfare

One three-year-old’s explanation for being in the kitchen atop a chair, eating cookies: “I just climbed up to smell them, and my tooth got caught.”1

1 Michael P. Green, ed., Illustrations for Biblical Preaching: Over 1500 Sermon Illustrations Arranged by Topic and Indexed Exhaustively, Revised edition of: The expositor’s illustration file. (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1989).

Last week we discovered that Peter warned us to be alert to an enemy, the devil, that is lurking in the shadows like a lion on his prey. Tonight now that we know about the Lion.. we are given strange advice… Peter does not tell us to be very quiet and hope the ravenous beast of darkness does not see us… we are to dig in and resist him! Wait… WHAT??? Yup … resist. Tonight we will discover that we as believers can use both what we know and who we know to resist the devil.

Resist The Devil With What You Know.

1 Peter 5:9 KJV

Whom resist stedfast in the faith, knowing that the same afflictions are accomplished in your brethren that are in the world.

You Know Retreat is not an Option

James 4:7 KJV

Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you.

Ephesians 6:11–13 KJV

Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. 

For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places. 

Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand.

The Greek word translated “resist” means “to withstand, to be firm against someone else’s onset” rather than “to strive against that one.” The Christian would do well to remember that he cannot fight the devil. The latter was originally the most powerful and wise angel God created. He still retains much of that power and wisdom as a glance down the pages of history and a look about one today will easily show. While the Christian cannot take the offensive against Satan, yet he can stand his ground in the face of his attacks. Cowardice never wins against Satan, only courage.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 130.

You Know You Stand On Solid Ground – Steadfast

The devil is resisted by being “firm in faith.” The concept is not that of holding certain doctrines firmly, which is a meaning of faith found in the Pastorals (e.g., 1 Tim. 1:19; 6:21; 2 Tim. 2:18), but that of remaining firm in one’s trust in God. The word “firm” originally applied to physical firmness or hardness, such as a firm foundation (2 Tim. 2:19) or solid (versus soft or liquid) food (Heb. 5:12, 14) or (in its verbal form) firm feet (i.e., feet that no longer gave way under the weight of the person, Acts 3:7, 16). Here the term is applied to character, as is its verbal form in Acts 16:5, where the new churches become firm in their commitment to Christ (= faith).1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 191–192.

You Know Brothers and Sisters in the Faith Worldwide Face the Same Struggles.

Romans 1:8 KJV

First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for you all, that your faith is spoken of throughout the whole world.

One thing that will make their commitment firmer is the awareness that they are not suffering alone. It is not “just me” who is suffering or even “just us,” laments that make the suffering seem unfair and unjust, but “your brotherhood throughout the world.” Peter stresses this unity in two ways—first, by using the collective “brotherhood” (which he alone in the NT uses, cf. 2:17, his other use, or “brotherly love” in 1:22 and 3:18) instead of the more individual “brothers” (a term he uses only in 5:12), and second, by adding “throughout the world,” which phrase uses “world” in its physical and global sense (as do Mark 4:8; 14:9; Rom. 1:8; 1 Cor. 14:10; 1 Pet. 1:20; cf. 2 Macc. 3:12) rather than in its ethical sense (i.e., human culture in its independence of and hostility toward God, as in John 15:18–19; 16:33; Jas. 4:4)1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 192–193.

1 Corinthians 10:13 KJV

There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.

A pastor warned his handsome new assistant about the dangers of immorality in the ministry. The assistant said that he always did his socializing in a group setting and concluded that “there is safety in numbers.” The wise pastor replied, “Yes, that is so, but there is more safety in Exodus.”1

1 Michael P. Green, ed., Illustrations for Biblical Preaching: Over 1500 Sermon Illustrations Arranged by Topic and Indexed Exhaustively, Revised edition of: The expositor’s illustration file. (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1989).

Resist The Devil With Who You Know

1 Peter 5:10–11 KJV

But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. 

To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

The God of all Grace

 • That called you

Philippians 1:6 KJV

Being confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ:

 • That called you to His eternal glory

This effectual call is with a view to God’s eternal glory. That is, God calls us into salvation in order that He may derive glory for Himself by virtue of our being saved. He who has called us in His grace will supply all needed grace until we are ushered into the Glory. God’s eternal glory is involved in His keeping a believer in salvation.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 131.

The God Who Will Use Your Temporary Suffering

1 Peter 1:6 KJV

Wherein ye greatly rejoice, though now for a season, if need be, ye are in heaviness through manifold temptations:

 • To Make You Perfect

The words “make you perfect” are not the translation of the Greek word teleioo (???????) which means “to perfect” in the sense of “to make spiritually mature and complete,” but from a word meaning “to fit or join together.” The predominating idea in the verb is adjustment, the putting of parts into right relationship and connection with one another. It is the same word translated “perfecting” in Ephesians 4:12, where the gifted servants of the Lord mentioned were given to the Church for the equipping of the saints for ministering work. The word was used of James and John mending their nets, thus equipping them for service (Mark 1:19). Here the word refers to God mending the lives of Christians, thus equipping them for usefulness in His service. The word in First Peter speaks of the work of the Holy Spirit in rounding out the spiritual life of the saint so that he is equipped for both the living of a Christian life and the service of the Lord Jesus.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 131.

 • To Stablish You

The word “stablish” is the translation of a Greek word whose root is akin to the word translated “stedfast” in 5:9. It speaks of a solid foundational position. Alford translates, “shall ground you as on a foundation.” Bengel has a helpful note on this verse; “Shall perfect, that no defect remain in you, shall stablish that nothing may shake you, shall strengthen that you may overcome every adverse force.” No comments on verse eleven.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 132.

 • To Strengthen You

Third, God will “strengthen” them. This is quite an unusual word meaning “to make strong,” found only here in biblical Greek (a related term appears in 3 Macc. 3:8, but that only once) and rarely in secular Greek. 1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 196

 • To Settle You

Finally God will “settle” them, a term meaning “to found” or “to place on a foundation” (Matt. 7:25; Eph. 3:17; Col. 1:23). This is an image of security, of people who cannot be moved no matter what comes against them. As such it rounds out the result of the other terms. While we have tried to give careful definitions of these four terms, it would be wrong to try to see some new idea in each of them. What Peter has done is pile up a number of closely related terms that together by their reinforcing one another give a multiple underscoring of the good that God is intending for them and even now is producing in their suffering.1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 196

——

When tempted, learn the lesson of the dog. Anyone who has trained a dog to obey knows this scene. A bit of meat or bread is placed on the floor near the dog and the master says, “No!” which the dog knows means that he must not touch it. The dog will usually take his eyes off the food, because the temptation to disobey would be too great, and instead will fix his eyes on the master’s face. That is the lesson of the dog. Always look to the Master’s face.1

1 Michael P. Green, ed., Illustrations for Biblical Preaching: Over 1500 Sermon Illustrations Arranged by Topic and Indexed Exhaustively, Revised edition of: The expositor’s illustration file. (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1989).

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 6:40 PM December 2, 2020.

Know Your Enemy

Wednesday, November 25th, 2020


Know Your Enemy

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Satan; Spiritual Warfare / 1 Peter 5:8

Warren Wiersbe tells this story:

 Since I have no mechanical ability, I admire people who can build and repair things. During a church building program, I was watching an electrician install a complex control panel. I said to the man, “It just amazes me how you fellows can calmly work on those lines with all of that power there. How do you do it?” The electrician smiled and said, “Well, the first thing you have to do is respect it. Then you can handle it.”

Satan is a dangerous enemy. He is a serpent who can bite us when we least expect it. He is a destroyer (Abaddon and Apollyon both mean “destruction”) and an accuser (Zech. 3:1–5; Rev. 12:9–11). He has great power and intelligence, and a host of demons who assist him in his attacks against God’s people (Eph. 6:10ff). He is a formidable enemy; we must never joke about him, ignore him, or underestimate his ability. We must “be sober” and have our minds under control when it comes to our conflict with Satan.1

1 Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 432.

Tonight we are going to look at a familiar and powerful verse. We are going to be reminded that we cannot be lulled into a false sense of safety. Our foe, an evil predator, is lurking in the shadows. It is important that you know your enemy.

Be Sober!

1 Peter 5:8 KJV

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

30.25 ????a: (a figurative extension of meaning of ???? ‘to be sober, to not be drunk,’ probably not occurring in the NT; see 88.86) to be in control of one’s thought processes and thus not be in danger of irrational thinking—‘to be sober-minded, to be well composed in mind.’ ???? ?????????? ??? ??????? ‘but we should be awake and sober-minded’ 1 Th 5:6. It is also possible to understand ???? in 1 Th 5:6 as meaning ‘self-control,’ as a characteristic of moral behavior (see 88.86).1

1 Johannes P. Louw and Eugene Albert Nida, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains (New York: United Bible Societies, 1996), 352.

nepho (????, 3525) signifies “to be free from the influence of intoxicants”; in the NT, metaphorically, it does not in itself imply watchfulness, but is used in association with it, 1 Thess. 5:6, 8; 2 Tim. 4:5; 1 Pet. 1:13; 4:7, rv (kjv, “watch”); 5:8.¶ Cf. eknepho and ananepho, under AWAKE, No. 3 and Note.1

1 W. E. Vine, Merrill F. Unger, and William White Jr., Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Nashville, TN: T. Nelson, 1996), 583.

Matthew 24:42–43 KJV

Watch therefore: for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come. 

But know this, that if the goodman of the house had known in what watch the thief would come, he would have watched, and would not have suffered his house to be broken up.

1 Thessalonians 5:6 KJV

Therefore let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober.

Be Vigilant

1 Peter 5:8 KJV

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

27.56 ????????b: (a figurative extension of meaning of ????????a ‘to stay awake,’ 23.72) to be in continuous readiness and alertness to learn—‘to be alert, to be watchful, to be vigilant.’ ??????????, ??????? ?? ?? ?????? ‘be alert, stand fast in the faith’ 1 Cor 16:13.1

1 Johannes P. Louw and Eugene Albert Nida, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains (New York: United Bible Societies, 1996), 332.

The words “be vigilant” in the Greek present the idea of “be awake and watchful.”1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 129.

1 Corinthians 16:13 KJV

Watch ye, stand fast in the faith, quit you like men, be strong.

Be Aware

1 Peter 5:8 KJV

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Of Who Your Enemy Is

Our adversary

Enemy (compare Matt 5:25) is literally “plaintiff” or “opponent in a lawsuit” (compare Prov 18:7), but in an extended sense is used to mean an enemy (compare Est 8:11). Devil also carries the same meaning (that is, “accuser”), but with the implication that the charge is false. It is possible, however, that Devil has already become a title or a name, and the TEV indicates this understanding by capitalizing the word (also Brc).1

1 Daniel C. Arichea and Eugene Albert Nida, A Handbook on the First Letter from Peter, UBS Handbook Series (New York: United Bible Societies, 1980), 167.

39.9 ?????????b, ?? m: one who is actively and continuously hostile toward someone—‘adversary, enemy.’ ? ????????? ???? ???????? ?? ???? ????????? ????????? ‘your adversary, the Devil, roams around like a roaring lion’ 1 Pe 5:8.1

1 Johannes P. Louw and Eugene Albert Nida, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains (New York: United Bible Societies, 1996), 492.

The Devil

The word “devil” is the word used in the English translation for diabolos (????????) which comes from a word diaballo (????????) which means literally, “to throw over or across, to send over.” It was used in classical Greek with the meanings, “to traduce, calumniate, slander, accuse, defame,” and was used not only of those who bring a false charge against one, but also of those who disseminate the truth concerning a man and do so maliciously, insidiously, with hostility.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 129.

 The nt uses both “Satan” and “devil” as terms for the chief figure of evil in the Bible. The Hebrew term satan used in the ot means “adversary” (e.g., Job 1:6, 12; 2:1; Zech 3:1–2).

Satan in the Old Testament and the Serpent of Genesis 3

a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour Peter alerts his audience to the devil’s constant threat to the people of God (compare 2 Cor 2:11).1

1 John D. Barry et al., Faithlife Study Bible (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012, 2016), 1 Pe 5:8.

This spiritual adversary, shadowy in the OT, was developed in the Intertestamental period and with that background appears in the NT as a well-known image, either as Satan (i.e., a transliterated form of the Hebrew; e.g., Mark 1:13 and Mark 8:33 and their parallels; 1 Cor. 5:5; 7:5) or as “the devil,” as here (i.e., a translation of the Hebrew term, meaning “slanderer”; e.g., Matt. 4:1, 8, 11; Eph. 4:27; 6:11; cf. 1 Tim. 3:11; 2 Tim. 3:3; Tit. 2:3 for the general use of the word). Our author further describes him as an “adversary,” a term that originally meant “opponent in a lawsuit” (Matt. 5:25; Luke 12:58; 18:3) and may mean that here (should Peter be thinking of the picture in Job or Zechariah, or the scene in Rev. 12:10, in which Satan accuses the righteous before God) but is more likely used in the general sense of “adversary” or “enemy,” which use is also found in the Greek OT (1 Kings 2:10; Isa. 41:11; Sir. 36:6), since no reference to a court scene appears in this passage. 1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 189–190.

Roaring Lion

Psalm 22:13 KJV

They gaped upon me with their mouths, As a ravening and a roaring lion.

Lions were viewed as the most ferocious and mighty beasts, and from Psalm 22:13 (probably the background here) they came to be used as figures for enemies of God’s people. In the time of Nero, Christians were fed to some literal lions as well. The small, isolated Christian communities could take heart that their other spiritual siblings—starting with the churches Peter knew in Rome—were experiencing the same trials (1 Pet 5:9), until the end (v. 10).1

1 Craig S. Keener, The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1993), 1 Pe 5:8–11.

In a vivid image Peter warns the church of deadly danger. Our image of a roaring lion may come from visits to the zoo, or from the zoom lens of a television nature series. Some who received Peter’s letter would have a stronger horror. They had seen human blood dripping from the chops of lions in the gory spectacles of a Roman amphitheatre. The time was approaching when Ignatius would anticipate his death in the Roman Colosseum:1

1 Edmund P. Clowney, The Message of 1 Peter: The Way of the Cross, The Bible Speaks Today (Leicester, England; Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1988), 213.

Of What Your Enemy Is Up To

Walketh about

Walketh about (?????????). Compare Job 1:7; 2:2. This word gave name to that sect of Greek philosophers known as Peripatetics, because they walked about while teaching or disputing. “St. Peter calls Satan the Peripatetic” (Cox, on Job). The Arabs call him the Busy One. It was to Peter that Christ said, “Satan hath desired to have you,” etc. (Luke 22:31).1

1 Marvin Richardson Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament, vol. 1 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887), 669–670.

Job 1:7 KJV

And the LORD said unto Satan, Whence comest thou? Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it.

Job 2:2 KJV

And the LORD said unto Satan, From whence comest thou? And Satan answered the LORD, and said, From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it.

Luke 22:31 KJV

And the Lord said, Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat:

Seeking whom he may devour.

Looking for someone to devour describes the typical activity of the lion. That the intended victims are the Christians is clear from someone. Devour is literally “swallow” or “drink down,” “eat up”; in the present context, it refers to the activity of the Devil in trying to destroy believers, particularly their faith, and lead them into apostasy, that is, to deny their faith in Jesus Christ. Implied in all these is the thought that the sufferings experienced by Christians are not simply the work of people, but are instigated by the Devil himself.

Rarely can one translate literally looking for someone to devour, since a term which relates to “eating” may not suggest the process of “destroying.” Therefore, one can sometimes better render looking for someone to devour as “looking for someone to destroy” or “… to ruin.”1

1 Daniel C. Arichea and Eugene Albert Nida, A Handbook on the First Letter from Peter, UBS Handbook Series (New York: United Bible Societies, 1980), 168.

__________________

The devil has a plan for your life: Doubt – To make you question God’s word and His goodness; Discouragement – To make you look at your problems rather than at God; Diversion – To make the wrong things seems attractive so that you will want them more than the right things; Defeat – To make you feel like a failure so that you don’t even try; Delay – To make you put off doing something so that it never gets done.

So Be Sober- free from mind distractions

Be vigilant – aware and awake

Be aware – the Devil is like a lurking Lion… and he is furiously hungry… know your enemy.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:45 PM November 25, 2020.

Everybody Wins

Wednesday, November 18th, 2020


Everybody Wins!

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Strange and Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Humility; Submission; Submission of the Clergy / 1 Peter 5:5–7

Robert Roberts writes about a fourth grade class in which the teacher introduced a game called “balloon stomp.” A balloon was tied to every child’s leg, and the object of the game was to pop everyone else’s balloon while protecting one’s own. The last person with an intact balloon would win.

The fourth graders in Roberts’ story entered into the spirit of the game with vigor. Balloons were relentlessly targeted and destroyed. A few of the children clung to the sidelines like wallflowers at a middle school dance, but their balloons were doomed just the same. The entire battle was over in a matter of seconds, leaving only one balloon inflated. Its owner was, of course, the most disliked kid in the class. It’s hard to really win at a game like balloon stomp. In order to complete your mission, you have to be pushy, rude and offensive.

Roberts goes on to write that a second class was introduced to the same game. Only this time it was a class of mentally handicapped children. They were given the same explanation as the first class, and the signal to begin was given. But the game proceeded very differently. Perhaps the instructions were given too quickly for children with learning disabilities to grasp them. The one idea that got through was that the balloons were supposed to be popped. So it was the balloons, not the other players, that were viewed as enemies. Instead of fighting each other, they began helping each other pop balloons. One little girl knelt down and held her balloon carefully in place, like a holder for a field goal kicker. A little boy stomped it flat. Then he knelt down and held his balloon for her. It went on like this for several minutes until all the balloons were vanquished, and everybody cheered. Everybody won.

Who got the game right, and who got the game wrong? In our world, we tend to think of another person’s success as one less opportunity for us to succeed. There can only be one top dog, one top banana, one big kahuna. If we ever find ourselves in that enviable position, we will fight like mad to maintain our hold on it. A lot of companies fail to enjoy prolonged success because the people in charge have this “balloon stomp” mentality. In the church, the rules change. Jesus Christ gets top billing. We’re just here to serve his purposes, and we do that most effectively by elevating others and humbling ourselves.

We humans can be prideful, competitive and selfishly independent. “You are not the boss of me!” is a phrase uttered from the youngest among us. We do not do well as a community of believers if we all function like that. We were designed to function within a body all with different roles that complement not compete with each other.

As the Apostle Peter draws his first letter to scattered pilgrims in the first century, he focuses on preparing them for the ongoing battle with the forces of darkness by working together. Last week we learned the role and function of the Elder/Pastor/Bishop in the local church. Tonight we will discover the role and attitude we all must take on in order to ensure that in this game of the Christian life, everybody wins.

Everybody Wins When We Follow The Leader

1 Peter 5:5 KJV

Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.

New Testament 5:1–5—Faithful Caretakers of the Flock

Respect for parents, elders and, in Judaism, those more knowledgeable in the law was socially obligatory in antiquity; some Jewish traditions regarded it as an expression of one’s respect for God. Such respect included deferring to the wisdom of older men and allowing them to speak first. Peter advocates submission to the ruling elders (5:1), but he also urges—against Greco-Roman society’s ideals—mutual humility, based on the teaching of the Old Testament (Prov 3:34).

Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words Subject, Subjection

hupotasso (????????, 5293), primarily a military term, “to rank under” 

Hebrews 13:17 KJV

Obey them that have the rule over you, and submit yourselves: for they watch for your souls, as they that must give account, that they may do it with joy, and not with grief: for that is unprofitable for you.

Everybody Wins When We Clothe Ourselves With Humility

1 Peter 5:5 KJV

Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.

Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament 18. Christian Humility, a Safeguard against Satan and a Source of Strength in Suffering (5:5b-14)

THE subject of humility begins with the second sentence of verse five. The words “be subject to” are not in the best Greek texts. We have left them out of the fuller translation. “Be clothed with” is the translation of a word which speaks of the act of tying or tucking up the long outer garments of the oriental around the waist as a roll or band or girth. It refers to the same action as Peter mentions in 1:13 where he says, “Gird up the loins of your mind.” The word in its noun form referred to a slave’s apron under which the loose outer garments were gathered. The exhortation is to put on humility as a working virtue which would make all the other virtues what they should be, thus workable in the Christian scheme of things. The other virtues such as kindness, generosity, justice, goodness, longsuffering, when saturated with humility, are most acceptable and praiseworthy, but when seen in a proud person, are like clanging brass or a tinkling cymbal.

John 13:4–5 KJV

He riseth from supper, and laid aside his garments; and took a towel, and girded himself. 

After that he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith he was girded.

The word he uses for to clothe oneself is very unusual; it is egkombousthai, which is derived from kombos, and describes anything tied on with a knot. Connected with it is egkomb?ma, a garment tied on with a knot. It was commonly used for protective clothing; it was used for a pair of sleeves drawn over the sleeves of a robe and tied behind the neck. And it was used for a slave’s apron. There was a time when Jesus had put upon himself just such an apron. At the Last Supper, John says of him that he tied a towel around himself, and took water and began to wash his disciples’ feet (John 13:4–5). Jesus put on the apron of humility, and so must his followers.

It so happens that egkombousthai is used of another kind of garment. It is also used of putting on a long, stole-like garment which was the sign of honour and prestige.

To complete the picture, we must put both images together. Jesus once put on the slave’s apron and undertook the humblest of all duties, washing his disciples’ feet; so we must in all things put on the apron of humility in the service of Christ and of other people; but that very apron of humility will become the garment of honour for us, for it is the one who is the servant of all who is greatest in the kingdom of heaven.1

1 William Barclay, The Letters of James and Peter, 3rd ed. fully rev. and updated., The New Daily Study Bible (Louisville, KY; London: Westminster John Knox Press, 2003), 312–313.

Proverbs 3:34 KJV

Surely he scorneth the scorners: But he giveth grace unto the lowly.

James 4:6 KJV

But he giveth more grace. Wherefore he saith, God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble.

Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament 18. Christian Humility, a Safeguard against Satan and a Source of Strength in Suffering (5:5b-14)

The word “resisteth” in the Greek is a military term, used of an army drawn up for battle. Pride calls out God’s armies. God sets Himself in array against the proud person. The word “proud” is the translation of a Greek word which means literally “to show above,” and thus describes the proud person as one who shows himself above others. The word “humble” is the translation of the Greek word rendered “lowly” in Matthew 11:29, where it describes our Lord’s character. The word is found in an early secular document where it speaks of the Nile River in its low stage in the words, “It runs low.” The word means “not rising far from the ground.” It describes the Christian who follows in the humble and lowly steps of his Lord.

…gives grace to the humble Speaking now to all believers, Peter draws on the Septuagint (ancient Greek ot) version of Prov 3:34 to stress the importance of humility in the Christian community. The nt frequently exhorts believers to cultivate an attitude of humility (e.g., Eph 4:2; Phil 2:3; Col 3:12; 1 Pet 3:8).1

1 John D. Barry et al., Faithlife Study Bible (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012, 2016), 1 Pe 5:5.

Everybody Wins When We Allow Ourselves to be Humbled By God.

1 Peter 5:6 KJV

Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time:

The verb translated “humble yourselves” is not in the aorist middle but the passive voice, which means that the subject of the verb is passive in the hands of God and is acted upon by Him. The exhortation is, “Be humbled,” or “Suffer yourselves to be humbled.” The humbling process which God was using was the persecution and suffering through which these Christians were passing. Peter exhorts these believers to react towards these in a God-honoring way, to be submissive to the discipline which God was using to make them more humble. But with this exhortation comes also a note of comfort and hope in that the presence of humility in the life of a Christian is the prerequisite that God demands before He will exalt that Christian to a high place of privilege and honor in His service. As someone has said, “He must take a low place before God, who would take a high place before men.”1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 128.

James 4:10 KJV

Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and he shall lift you up.

Everybody Wins When We Cast Our Care On God.

1 Peter 5:7 KJV

Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you.

Then comes an exhortation to cast all our care upon Him. The command is directly and vitally related to the context. These Christians were undergoing such persecution that the circumstances in which they found themselves gave abundant opportunity for that sin called worry. The apostle exhorts them that while this humbling process is going on, they should cast all their care upon God. The word “care” is the translation of a Greek word which means “anxiety” or “worry.” The word “all” in the Greek text has the idea, not of every worry that comes along, but the whole of their worries. They are to cast upon God the whole of their worries, that is, come to the place where they resolve to cast the whole of their future worries upon Him, and the result will be that when those things that would otherwise worry them come up, they will not worry. The word “cast” is the translation of a word that means “having deposited with.” It refers here to a direct and once-for-all committal to God of all that would give us concern

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 128–129.

The words “for he careth for you” can be translated literally, “for it is a care to Him concerning you,” or “for you are His concern.” Anxiety is a self-contradiction to true humility. Unbelief is, in a sense, an exalting of self against God in that one is depending upon self and failing to trust God. Why worry therefore, if we are His concern. He is more concerned about our welfare than we could possibly be. Furthermore, since the humbling process has been allowed to come to us in the permissive will of God, and He is using it to accomplish His purpose in our lives, He has it under His control and us in His care. In it all He is concerned about us, therefore, again, why worry?1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 129.

A doctor had to give a painful shot to a four-year-old girl. When she learned what the doctor was about to do, her face showed her anxiety and her body tensed. As the doctor picked up what looked to the little girl to be a needle large enough to kill an elephant, she turned her eyes to her father, who then took her hand and fixed his eyes on hers. An expression of confidence and calmness came on her face. She knew she was not alone and found comfort, not in her father’s spoken answer, but in his presence with her in her time of trial.1

1 Michael P. Green, ed., Illustrations for Biblical Preaching: Over 1500 Sermon Illustrations Arranged by Topic and Indexed Exhaustively, Revised edition of: The expositor’s illustration file. (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1989).

God has given us exactly what we need to navigate these difficult times. We have Under-Shepherds to guide us. We have Humility to redirect us. We have Prayer to unburden us. We all win when we work the plan and when we work it together.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 2:57 PM November 18, 2020.

Happy Trials

Wednesday, November 4th, 2020


Happy Trials

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Trial / 1 Peter 4:14–19

I think that you are all at least familiar with the TV show “Survivor,” whether you have watched it or not. It is what they call now a “reality” game show. 16 people are put into an environment like an island, and the goal is to be the winner of a $1 million prize. Fortunately for the participants, they are voted off by the other participants, not burned at the stake of sacrificed to a volcano. After they are voted off about the worst thing that happens is they might be humiliated on the internet. In fact, they are flown from the hostile environment in which they have been living, and taken to a posh resort. Many of them make TV appearances and some even are able to launch a new career afterward.

The modern day game show “Survivor” pales in comparison to the high stakes game of life that Martin Luther became involved in when he opposed the established authorities in the Church. For Martin Luther spiritual survival was of foremost importance, and he understood how important that was for every person. No matter what may happen in life, no matter how bad circumstances may get, spiritual survival comes first. Martin Luther had it straight. He knew that spiritual survival in a hostile spiritual environment dictates a firm confession of faith.

For us in our spiritual environment it has not really gotten any easier. The Bible tells us to expect trials and troubles as we struggle to survive the hostile wilderness of this world.

The Apostle Peter also knew what it was like to suffer for Jesus, to make a stand with no turning back. In our passage this evening we will discover that when we are square in the middle of God’s perfect will, our trials can in a way be happy trials… we can know the joy of sweetly suffering for our Savior.

When The Spirit of Glory Rests Upon You.

1 Peter 4:14 KJV

If ye be reproached for the name of Christ, happy are ye; for the spirit of glory and of God resteth upon you: on their part he is evil spoken of, but on your part he is glorified.

Matthew 5:11 KJV

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Peter again referred to Jesus’ teaching (Matt. 5:11). If a Christian was insulted (cf. 1 Peter 3:9) because of the name of Christ, he should be considered blessed (makarioi; cf. 3:14). Anything that we suffer for the sake of Christ is a privilege, not a penalty1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 854.

Happy are ye

The apostle says that in view of the fact that they are being reproached, they are happy. The word “happy” is the translation of a Greek word which means “prosperous.” It is used in Matthew 5:3–11, where it is translated “blessed.” It refers in these contexts to a spiritually prosperous state or condition of the believer. That is, if the world persecutes a Christian, that is an indication of the spiritual prosperity of his life. The world does not persecute a worldly Christian, only a spiritual one. It is spirituality that rubs its fur the wrong way.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 120.

Matthew 11:28 KJV

Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

But not only is the fact of persecution an indication of a spiritually prosperous life, but also of the fact that the Holy Spirit is resting upon the Christian. The words “rest upon” are the translation of a Greek word used in a manuscript of 103 b.c. as a technical term in agriculture. The writer speaks of a farmer resting his land by sowing light crops upon it. He relieved the land of the necessity of producing heavy crops, and thus gave it an opportunity to recuperate its strength. The word is used in Matthew 11:28 where our Lord says, “Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest,” literally, “and I will rest you.” Here our Lord causes the sinner who comes to Him to cease from his own efforts at carrying his load of guilt and suffering, taking it upon Himself, allowing the believer in his new life powers to function as a child of God. In our First Peter passage, the Holy Spirit rests and refreshes the believer in the sense that He takes over the saint’s battle with sin and the heretofore futile effort at living a life pleasing to God, by giving him victory over the evil nature whose power was broken the moment God saved him, and by producing in his life His own fruit. The Spirit of the Glory, even the Spirit of God, is resting with refreshing power upon the child of God, causing him to live a life which pleases God and toward which the world hurls its venom and hate. The words “on their part he is evil spoken of, but on your part he is glorified,” while true, do not appear in the best Greek texts, and are not therefore thought to be part of the original manuscript that left the hands of Peter. We have therefore not included them in the translation.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 120–121.

When You Do Not Suffer For Your Own Sin

1 Peter 4:15 KJV

But let none of you suffer as a murderer, or as a thief, or as an evildoer, or as a busybody in other men’s matters.

Peter stressed that persecution was no excuse for lawlessness. Christians were not to retaliate (3:9). Physical violence was not to be met by murder. Confiscation of property was not to be compensated for by theft. No matter what their trials, Christians were to do nothing that would justify punishing them as criminals (cf. 2:19; 3:17). They were not to suffer as a murderer or thief or any other kind of criminal, or even as a meddler. Even interfering in other people’s affairs is out of place for Christians (cf. 1 Tim. 5:13).1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 

1 Timothy 5:13 KJV

And withal they learn to be idle, wandering about from house to house; and not only idle, but tattlers also and busybodies, speaking things which they ought not.

The word “busybody” means in the Greek, “a self-appointed overseer in other men’s matters.”1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 121.

When You Are Not Ashamed

1 Peter 4:16–18 KJV

Yet if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God on this behalf. 

For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God? 

And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?

There is no shame if one suffer(s) as a Christian rather than as a V 2, p 855 criminal. On the contrary, that name should be a source of praise to God for it identifies the bearer with the blessings of salvation (cf. v. 11). The term “Christian” (Christianos) occurs only three times in the Bible (here and Acts 11:26; 26:28). It may have been used derisively by unbelievers, as an insult.1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 854–855.

The context in First Peter speaks of the persecutions which were allowed to come by God as a disciplinary judgment, the purpose of which was to purify their lives. They were being saved with difficulty in the sense that if it was necessary for God to purify the lives of saints by these drastic means, namely, persecution and suffering, what can one say as to the position of the unsaved in relation to God? If the righteous need disciplinary judgments, how much more will the unrighteous merit the wrath of God whose offer of righteousness they have rejected.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 122–123.

When You Commit Your Soul to God for Safekeeping

1 Peter 4:19 KJV

Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator.

The Greek word “commit” is a banking term meaning “to give in charge as a deposit.” Peter exhorts believers who are undergoing persecutions, that in view of the fact that these are allowed to come by God and are designed to purify their lives, they have every reason to trust Him to take care of them through all of their sufferings.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 123.

That word for “commit” is actually a banking term. It means to deposit something for safekeeping. Well, that’s what we’re to do with our lives when we go through times of suffering. Deposit your life in God’s bank (so to speak) for safe-keeping. Trust Him to preserve you in the fire. Give yourself to the Lord by continuing to do good.

That’s what Bethany Hamilton did. At one time, Bethany was ranked as the #1 amateur teen surfer in Hawaii. Then she lost an arm to a tiger shark in October 2003, but she never lost her faith.

Soon after the attack, she began to raise money to restore a man’s eyesight. While visiting New York City, she gave her ski coat to homeless girl. When asked about the gift, she said she had more than she needed in life.

At the time, Steve Thompson, her pastor, said, “She’s looking forward to the future. She’s asking herself, ‘How can I show the world I still have a life, that I enjoy my life, and that my life is filled with joy?’ She has an underlying trust that God is taking care of her.”

(Jill Lieber, “Teen Surfer Riding Wave of Amazing Grace,” USA Today, 3-19-04; www.PreachingToday.com)

Bethany Hamilton entrusted herself to her faithful Creator. She didn’t quit living when she lost her arm. No! She gave her life to God. She deposited her life for safekeeping into His hands; and now, God has given her an international platform from which to share her story and bring Him glory. Bethany Hamilton returned to surfing; and just over a year after the shark attack, she took 1st place in the Explorer Women’s division of the 2005 NSSA National Championships — winning her first National Title. Since then, she has turned pro, and a major motion picture about her life was just released this last April (2011). It’s called Soul Surfer, and God is using it to bring hope to people all over the world. (www.BethanyHamilton.com)

(From a sermon by C. Philip Green, In the Fire! 7/30/2011)

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:26 PM November 4, 2020.

Finish Well

Tuesday, September 29th, 2020

Finish Well

Keep your Eyes on the Game Clock

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here / 1 Peter 4:7–8

Although the Cleveland Browns remained a competitive and strong team in the post-Jim-Brown era, they had yet to earn a Super Bowl win.

However, a combination of a strong quarterback in Bernie Kosar and skilled receivers in 1986 helped the team gain a level of success that they hadn’t achieved in years.

For a start, they won their first playoff game since 1969 when they beat the New York Jets in an overtime game.

Kosar had a career season that year – he threw for nearly 4,000 yards and became the king of comebacks and thrilling last-minute wins.

During the Jets game, he set records with 33 completions in 64 attempts as he piled on 489 yards.

And in the AFC Championship Game, he would be facing off against the Denver Broncos and a young John Elway, a talented quarterback who also seemed to know how to win in tight spots.

The game was a brutal back-and-forth competition that saw both teams at their best for the season.

However, the Browns led 20-13 with 5:32 remaining after scoring and kicked the ball to Denver.

The Broncos struggled to get the ball into play and started on their own two-yard line. Cleveland fans were pleased, but Denver was confident in spite of their position.

The first play of “The Drive” was a five-yard pass that took Denver out of safety danger.

On second down and 5, running back Sandy Winder ran three years to the 10-yard line.

Winder ran again the next play to pick up two yards and the first down.

Now on the 12-yard line, the Broncos had a little breathing room – the next play was a winder run for three yards and the next an 11-yard Elway dash.

On the 26-yard line, the Broncos still had some room to go and some time to burn.

But on two consecutive passes, Elway moved the team 34 yards (22 and 12 yards, respectively) to put the team on their 40-yard line.

The two-minute warning occurred just after the play – the Broncos had moved over half the football field in about three minutes.

Many assumed they still did not have time to finish, but others noted the Browns had yet to force a fourth down.

They wouldn’t for the rest of the game.

At first down and 10, Elway missed a pass to Vance Johnson – one of only a handful of unproductive plays in “The Drive.” Cleveland’s Dave Puzzuoli then sacked Elway for an eight-yard loss that seemed to seal the deal on the game.

However, Elway connected with Mark Jackson on third down and 18 to get 20 yards and the first down on the 14-yard line.

After another incomplete pass – with 0:57 left – Elway scrambled for nine yards to set up a five-yard touchdown pass to Mark Johnson.

With just 0:39 left on the clock, kicker Rick Karlis added the extra point to tie the game 20-20.

Denver won 23-20 in overtime with a field goal.

Cleveland was stunned – though Denver would lose to the Giants in the Super Bowl 39-20 – Elway would later win two Super Bowls and was elected to the NFL Hall of Fame.

While Kosar went on to earn a Super Bowl ring in 1994, the Browns have still never won as a team.

John Elway was known as the quarterback responsible for THE DRIVE. He knew time was running out and acted accordingly. He knew how to manage the clock to his best advantage.

The Apostle Peter warns us to be aware of the clock. Like Elway, our time is limited. We are in the 4th quarter with less than 5 minutes to play. Let us follow the advice given in this general epistle and finish well.

The End Is Near

1 Peter 4:7 KJV

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

 • Death is certain and life is short.

Psalm 90:12 KJV

So teach us to number our days, That we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.

James 4:14 KJV

Whereas ye know not what shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? It is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away.

 • Christ’s Return is Imminent 

Romans 13:12 KJV

The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.

Revelation 22:20 KJV

He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

There is a great contrast between the believers of the apostolic age and ourselves. The voyager detects the near proximity of land by the fresh land-breeze which breathes in his face, wafting the sounds and scents of forest, or prairie, or heather covered hill. So through these Epistles we inhale another atmosphere than that with which we are so familiar in Christian societies. We live in the world and pay occasional visits into the unseen and eternal; they lived in the unseen and eternal, and paid periodic necessary visits into the world. We conform to the world; they were transformed by the daily renewing of their minds. We read the society papers, discuss society gossip, send our children into society, and strive to hold our own in dress and appointments with the cream of society around us; they, on the other hand, were thought strange and ridiculous, because they lived amongst men as “the children of the resurrection.” Surely the contrast is not to our credit, although we vaunt our fancied superiority.

(F. B. Meyer, B.A.)

Be Sober

1 Peter 4:7 KJV

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

sophroneo (????????, 4993) signifies (a) “to be of sound mind,” or “in one’s right mind, sober-minded” (sozo, “to save,” phren, “the mind”), Mark 5:15 and Luke 8:35, “in his right mind” – VINE

Peter uses this expression a great deal. He actually means, “Be ye therefore intelligent.” Be an intelligent Christian. An intelligent Christian is one who knows the Bible; that is, he will know it the best he can. (I often make the confession that I marvel at my ignorance of the Word of God. The more I study it, the more I see how little I really know about the Word of God.) But, my friend, an intelligent, sober–minded Christian is going to know all he can about the Word of God.1

1 J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible Commentary: The Epistles (1 Peter), electronic ed., vol. 54 (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1991), 86–87.

Matthew 10:16 KJV

Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.

Be Watchful

1 Peter 4:7 KJV

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

This sanity will lead to being “clear-headed,” an idea Peter uses half of the times it occurs in the NT (1:13; 4:7; 5:8; cf. 1 Thess. 5:6, 8; 2 Tim. 4:5). The opposite of such clear-headedness was intoxication (cf. Eph. 4:18), so this term meant literally “not drunk” and figuratively that the mind was alert and clear, devoid of mental “intoxication” or fuzzy thinking. Thus our author is calling for a mental alertness that sees life correctly in the light of the coming end. This will lead to prayer 27—not the prayer based on daydreams and unreality, nor the prayer based on surprised desperation, but the prayer that calls upon and submits to God in the light of reality seen from God’s perspective and thus obtains power and guidance in the situation, however evil the time may be. 

Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 156–157.

Matthew 24:41–42 KJV

Two women shall be grinding at the mill; the one shall be taken, and the other left. 

Watch therefore: for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come.

Colossians 4:2 KJV

Continue in prayer, and watch in the same with thanksgiving;

1 Corinthians 15:34 KJV

Awake to righteousness, and sin not; for some have not the knowledge of God: I speak this to your shame.

An Australian air traffic controller left some airline passengers up in the air. The controller overslept and arrived late to work. As a result, the control tower at Canberra International Airport opened 20 minutes late, which forced an arriving Qantas Boeing 737 from Perth to circle over the city for 20 minutes because the only person on duty at the tower was not senior enough to issue a clearance for the plane to land. Ben Mitchell, spokesman for Air Services Australia, acknowledged the error. He said, “The guy slept in.” Mitchell said the passengers were never in any danger and the plane was able to land only 12 minutes after its scheduled arrival time. Authorities have changed the roster to ensure that two senior controllers are present when the tower opens to eliminate the problem—assuming both wake up on time.

Our laziness and lack of responsibility may not leave people literally up in the air, but nevertheless they have real consequences.

—Jim L. Wilson and Jim Sandell1

1 Jim L. Wilson and Jim Sandell, “Air Traffic Controller Oversleeps and Causes Delays,” in 300 Illustrations for Preachers, ed. Elliot Ritzema (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2015).

Be Loving

1 Peter 4:8 KJV

And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins.

 • In light of the temporary nature of things.

 • In light of the fact that we will soon have no more chance to forgive and restore.

 • Love and cover the sins of the past.

1 Corinthians 6:7 KJV

Now therefore there is utterly a fault among you, because ye go to law one with another. Why do ye not rather take wrong? why do ye not rather suffer yourselves to be defrauded?

“True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others at whatever cost.”

Proverbs 10:12 KJV

Hatred stirreth up strifes: But love covereth all sins.

1 Peter 1:22 KJV

Seeing ye have purified your souls in obeying the truth through the Spirit unto unfeigned love of the brethren, see that ye love one another with a pure heart fervently:

In Randy Alcorn’s book In Light of Eternity he imagines two twins having a conversation in their mother’s womb. “You know,” one says, “there’s a whole world out there–grassy meadows and snowy mountains, splashing streams and waterfalls, horses and dogs and cats and whales and giraffes. There are skyscrapers and cities and people like us–only much bigger–playing games like football and baseball and volleyball and going to the beach.” “Are you crazy?” the other twin responds. “That’s just wishful thinking. Everyone knows there’s no life after birth.” (Alcorn, In Light of Eternity, pg. 25)

It is easy to get caught up with the rhythm of life and lose track of the game clock. There are fewer and fewer chances to catch up. Let us be sober /intelligent. Let us be watchful/alert and driven to prayer. Let us love each other, pushing grievances against our brethren to the forgotten closet of our minds where they belong. There are better days coming and they are coming soon. Keep your eyes on the game clock and finish well.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 12:07 PM September 29, 2020.

Embrace The New Now

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

Embrace The New Now

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Strange and Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Conversion / 1 Peter 4:3–6

 In England there is a paper factory that makes the finest stationery in the world. One day a man touring the factory asked what it was made from. He was shown a huge pile of old rags and told that the rag content was what determined the quality of the paper. The visitor wouldn’t believe it. In weeks he received from the company a package of paper with his initials embossed on it. On the top piece were written the words “Dirty rags transformed.”

The same is true of the Christian life. It is a process of transformation from what we were into something new and wonderful.1

1 Michael P. Green, 1500 Illustrations for Biblical Preaching (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2000), 81.

Last week we discovered that we should arm ourselves with the mind of Christ in order to endure sufferings and live right. In tonight’s passage, we see that Peter turns the focus on how we should view our past before Christ. In light of the salvation that was purchased for us we are to vigorously live in the now because we have wasted enough time in the past, our former friends will not understand us, and our future is secure. As believers we are to embrace the new now.

Embrace the New Now Because Our Past Deeds Were a Waste.

1 Peter 4:3 KJV

For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the Gentiles, when we walked in lasciviousness, lusts, excess of wine, revellings, banquetings, and abominable idolatries:

 • lasciviousness

Then the apostle enumerates some of the sins which were part of that world out from which they were separated. “Lasciviousness” is the translation of a word which refers to actions that excite disgust and shock public decency. In the New Testament, the prominent idea in the word is that of sensuality.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • lusts

The Greek word translated “lusts” is not limited to the sense of a sexual desire, but has the unrestricted sense of a passionate desire, here a sinful one, as the context indicates.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • excess of wine

The words “excess of wine” are the translation of a Greek word made of two words, “wine” and “to bubble up or overflow.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • revellings

“Revellings” is the translation of a word which meant at first, “a village merrymaking.” Then it came to mean “a carousal” such as a party of revellers parading the streets, or revels held in religious ceremonies, wild, furious. and ecstatic.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • banquetings

“Banquetings” is from a Greek word speaking of drinking bouts possibly held in connection with pagan religious rites such as Paul speaks of in I Corinthians 10:14 where he forbids Christians to drink the cup of demons.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • abominable idolatries

The Greek word translated “abominable” means “contrary to law and justice, illicit, criminal.” These idolatries were forbidden by Roman law. They must have been pretty bad1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

Embrace The New Now Because Our Old Friends Will Not Understand.

1 Peter 4:4 KJV

Wherein they think it strange that ye run not with them to the same excess of riot, speaking evil of you:

 • Your new choices are seen as strange. You are headed in different directions.

2 Corinthians 6:14–17 KJV

Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? 

And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? 

And what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. 

Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you,

 • You no longer hang out with the same type of folks.

Psalm 1:1 KJV

Blessed is the man That walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, Nor standeth in the way of sinners, Nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful.

 • Same excess of riot

The word “excess” is the translation of a Greek word meaning literally “a pouring forth or an overflowing.” It was used in classical Greek of the tides which fill the hollows. Alford translates it by the word “slough,” a state of moral degradation or spiritual dejection into which one sinks or from which one cannot free one’s self.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 112.

 • Now they speak evil of you

The people of the world, the former associates of these Christians to whom Peter is writing, thought it a thing foreign to the natures of these Christians when they did not run any more in a troop like a band of revellers with them in the same slough of dissoluteness. They did not realize that their totally depraved nature which before salvation had given them a love for sinful things, now had its power over them broken, and that another nature, the divine nature, had been given them as their new motivating principle of life which caused them to hate the things they once loved and love the things they once hated.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 113.

A young girl who had recently become a Christian asked the famous Baptist Preacher Charles Spurgeon…”What friends do I need to give-up now?” The Prince of Preachers replied “Hey, you do not have to give up any of your friends, they would give you up” 

Embrace The New Now Because Your Future Is Secured.

1 Peter 4:5–6 KJV

Who shall give account to him that is ready to judge the quick and the dead. 

For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.

 • You will not face the Great White Throne.

Revelation 20:11–12 KJV

And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them. 

And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, according to their works.

 • You will face the Bema Seat

1 Corinthians 3:12–14 KJV

Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; 

Every man’s work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man’s work of what sort it is. 

If any man’s work abide which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward.

Sometimes we can be seduced by distorted memories of the past. Like the Israelites who longed for the fleshpots of Egypt, we can sometimes look backward. Live in the New Now! We wasted enough of our bodies souls and time in the corruption of the past. Live in the new now. Our old friends no longer share the same things in common. Live in the new now! We no longer are piling up judgement but are now accruing rewards. Live in the now now!

Armed With The Mind of Christ

Wednesday, September 16th, 2020

Armed With The Mind of Christ

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Submission; Self-denial; Self-control / 1 Peter 4:1–2

The key to success in most things is the proper mindset. In martial arts we are taught that the body will do what the mind will allow. As we try to shine as lights in a very dark world, we are faced with many things that would dim our light. An effective Christian has learned to obtain and maintain the right mindset.  

The Apostle Peter has been telling his sojourners that Jesus is our example. This evening we will learn that in order to effectively glorify God in our lifestyle we must arm ourselves with the mind of Christ.

The Mindset of Christ’s Selflessness.

1 Peter 4:1 KJV

Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

The words “suffered in the flesh” are in the same construction as the similar phrase “being put to death in the flesh” (3:18). In the latter expression we found that Peter was speaking of the fact that our Lord was put to death with respect to the flesh, thus suffering with respect to the flesh. This suffering was the result of unjust treatment. The same holds true in 4:1 where the Christian who has suffered in the flesh is the Christian who has suffered ill-treatment from the persecuting world of sinners. The fact that he has been persecuted is an indication of another fact, namely, that he has ceased from sin. The world directs its persecution against those who are living lives of obedience to God, thus those who have ceased from sin. The verb is passive. Literally, the Christian “hath got release” from sin. God broke the power of sin in his life when He saved him. Thus our reaction to unjust suffering should be that of a saint, not a sinner, since we have in salvation been released from sin’s compelling power.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 110–111.

_______________

Philippians 2:5–8 KJV

Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: 

Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 

But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 

And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.

__________

A.W. Tozer nailed the nail on the head, saying, “In every Christians heart there is a cross and a throne and the Christian is on the throne till he puts himself on the cross; if he refuses the cross he remains on the throne. Perhaps this is at the bottom of the backsliding and worldliness among believers today. We want to be saved but insist Christ do all the dying.”

Arm Yourself With Christ’s Sinlessness.

1 Peter 4:1 KJV

Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

Galatians 5:16–18 KJV

This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh. 

For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh: and these are contrary the one to the other: so that ye cannot do the things that ye would. 

But if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law.

 Finally, the point is that once the Christian grasps this insight he will realize from the example of Christ in 3:18–22 that he must live for God now (which means a suffering in the flesh and thus a battling of sin), for that will lead to a parallel victory (a state of having ceased from sin).1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 149.

Romans 6:6–7 KJV

Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. 

For he that is dead is freed from sin.

A wife came to the conclusion that carbonated drinks were having negative physical effects on her family and herself and so decided that they should give them up. But how would she convince her three-year-old daughter, who liked them so much, that it was necessary to stop drinking them?

As the wife was telling her husband of her decision, the little girl piped up to ask, “Mommy, we don’t like pop any more?” Mommy said “That’s right!”—and that was all it took.

Oh, for such a readiness to give up something when we learn that God does not want us to do it1

1 Michael P. Green, 1500 Illustrations for Biblical Preaching (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2000), 335–336.

Arm Yourself With Christ’s Surrender.

1 Peter 4:2 KJV

That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.

As a result Christians who have adopted Christ’s mind-set have counted themselves dead to sin. They live the rest of their lives not for evil human desires, but rather for the will of God (cf. 2:15; 3:17; 4:19).1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 852.

___________

In this verse, the apostle tells his readers why God breaks the power of the sinful nature at the moment the Christian is saved. It is in order that he should no longer live the rest of his earthly life in the sphere of the cravings (lusts) of men, but live in the sphere of the will of God. The word “lust” in Greek speaks of any strong craving, here, an evil craving.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 111.

_________________

On the other hand, since the flesh is weak and fallen, it is the mode of existence in which the evil impulse in human beings operates. Believers thus have a choice: (1) they can live their remaining time “for human desires,” or (2) they can live it “for the will of God.” The use of “desire” for this generalized “I want” within (“If it feels good, do it”) has already been noted by us earlier in 1 Peter (1:14; 2:11). What is unusual is his use of “human” to mean the same thing as “fleshly” (2:11) or “heathen” (4:3 = “will of the nations”). In other words, “human” means “unredeemed humanity.” Thus there is a clear choice between taking the path of least resistance to their natural desires and their committing themselves to follow God’s will, even if it entails suffering.1

1 Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, The New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990), 150.

___________

Andrew Murray put it this way, “Many Christians fear and flee and seek deliverance from all that would humble them. At times they may pray for humility but in their heart of hearts they pray even more to be kept from the things that would bring them to that place.”

Humility results in a life of dying to self which produces radical obedience and reckless abandon.

Jesus was humble and “obedient unto death…”

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 11:58 AM September 16, 2020.

Jesus: The Way To God.

Tuesday, September 8th, 2020

Jesus: The Way to God

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Salvation; Will of God; Preaching; Intercession / 1 Peter 3:18–22

Do you know just how much you are loved? Jesus loves you so much that He provided several ways to reach you and bring you to God. He paid the price for your sin. He reaches out for you through His Word and preaching. He gives you a clean slate by wiping out the old man and making you a new creature. He is constantly praying and interceding for you now. All of this was done in such a way that we could choose to accept Him or choose to reject Him. Jesus is the Door… the only way to God is through Him. If you accept His provisions, the door is open, if not the door to God is closed.

As Peter finishes chapter 3 by encouraging the suffering believers that they are following in the steps of the Savior because He suffered for them, Peter tells us about the different things Jesus did and is doing to bring us to God.  

This passage is one of the most difficult and complicated passages in the Bible. After much study and prayer, I believe we can navigate the deep truths of this text together.

The key is verse 18 to see that all that Jesus did was designed to bring us to God.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

 Christ Brings Us To God Through His Payment

Romans 5:6–8 KJV

For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. 

For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. 

But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

Christ Brings Us To God Through Preaching.

1 Peter 3:19–20 KJV

By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison; 

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.

______

3:19–20. Through whom … He … preached to the spirits in prison has been subject to many interpretations. Some believe Peter here referred to the descent of Christ’s Spirit into hades between His death and resurrection to offer people who lived before the Flood a second chance for salvation. However, this interpretation has no scriptural support.

Others have said this passage refers to Christ’s descent into hell after His crucifixion to proclaim His victory to the imprisoned fallen angels referred to in 2 Peter 2:4–5, equating them with “the sons of God” Moses wrote about (Gen. 6:1–2). Though much commends this view as a possible interpretation, the context seems more likely to be referring to humans rather than angels.

-Bible Knowledge Commentary

_______________________

The “spirits” (pneumasin, a term usually applied to supernatural beings but also used at least once to refer to human “spirits”; cf. Heb. 12:23) are described in 1 Peter 3:20 as those who were disobedient when God waited patiently for Noah to finish building the ark.

Hebrews 12:23 KJV

To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect,

They had rebelled against the message of God during the 120 years the ark was being built. God declared He would not tolerate people’s wickedness forever, but would extend His patience for only 120 more years (Gen. 6:3). Since the entire human race except Noah (Gen. 6:5–9) was evil, God determined to “wipe mankind … from the face of the earth.” The “spirits” referred to in 1 Peter 3:20 are probably the souls of the evil human race that existed in the days of Noah. Those “spirits” are now “in prison” awaiting the final judgment of God at the end of the Age.

Genesis 6:3 KJV

And the LORD said, My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years.

Genesis 6:5–9 KJV

And GOD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. 

And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart. 

And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them. 

But Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD. 

These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God.

The problem remains as to when Christ preached to these “spirits.” Peter’s explanation of the resurrection of Christ (3:18) “by the Spirit” brought to mind that the preincarnate Christ was actually in Noah, ministering through him, by means of the Holy Spirit. Peter (1:11) referred to the “Spirit of Christ” in the Old Testament prophets. Later he described Noah as “a preacher of righteousness” (2 Peter 2:5). The Spirit of Christ preached through Noah to the ungodly humans who, at the time of Peter’s writing, were “spirits in prison” awaiting final judgment.

1 Peter 1:11 KJV

Searching what, or what manner of time the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify, when it testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow.

2 Peter 2:5 KJV

And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;

This interpretation seems to fit the general theme of this section (1 Peter 3:13–22)—keeping a good conscience in unjust persecution. Noah is presented as an example of one who committed himself to a course of action for the sake of a clear conscience before God, though it meant enduring harsh ridicule. Noah did not fear men but obeyed God and proclaimed His message. Noah’s reward for keeping a clear conscience in unjust suffering was the salvation of himself and his family, who were saved through water, V 2, p 852 being brought safely through the Flood.1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 851–852.

_____

It would then be implied here, that though the instrumentality of Noah was employed, yet that it was done not by the Holy Spirit, but by him who afterwards became incarnate. On the supposition, therefore, that this whole passage refers to his preaching to the antediluvians in the time of Noah, and not to the ‘spirits’ after they were confined in prison, this is language which the apostle would have properly and probably used. If that supposition meets the full force of the language, then no argument can be based on it in proof that he went to preach to them after their death, and while his body was lying in the grave.1

1 Albert Barnes, Notes on the New Testament: James to Jude, ed. Robert Frew (London: Blackie & Son, 1884–1885), 177.

_____

When did Christ preach to the spirits in prison? “When once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah.” In Christ’s day, the spirits of those men to whom Noah had preached were in prison, for they had rejected the message of Noah. They had gone into sheol. They were waiting for judgment; they were lost. But Christ did not go down and preach to them after He died on the cross. He preached through Noah “when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah.” For 120 years Noah had preached the Word of God. He saved his family but no one else. It was the Spirit of Christ who spoke through Noah in Noah’s day. In Christ’s day, those who rejected Noah’s message were in prison. The thought is that Christ’s death meant nothing to them just as it means nothing to a great many people today who, as a result, will also come into judgment.1

1 J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible Commentary: The Epistles (1 Peter), electronic ed., vol. 54 (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1991), 76–77.

______________________

Christ Brings Us To God Through Purging

1 Peter 3:20–21 KJV

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water. 

The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ:

Romans 6:3–5 KJV

Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? 

Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. 

For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection:

Galatians 3:27 KJV

For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.

_________________

And this (ho, relative pronoun—“water” is the understood antecedent) water symbolizes baptism (baptisma). Baptism represents a complete break with one’s past life. As the Flood wiped away the old sinful world, so baptism pictures one’s break from his old sinful life and his entrance into new life in Christ. Peter now applied to his readers the principle he set forth in verses 13–17 and illustrated in verses 18–20. He exhorted them to have the courage to commit themselves to a course of action by taking a public stand for Christ through baptism. The act of public baptism would “save” them from the temptation to sacrifice their good consciences in order to avoid persecution. For a first-century Christian, baptism meant he was following through on his commitment to Christ, regardless of the consequences.

Baptism does not save from sin, but from a bad conscience. Peter clearly taught that baptism was not merely a ceremonial act of physical purification, but (alla, making a strong contrast) the pledge (eper?t?ma, also trans. “appeal”; cf. nasb) of a good conscience (syneid?se?s; cf. v. 16) toward God. Baptism is the symbol of what has already occurred in the heart and life of one who has trusted Christ as Savior (cf. Rom. 6:3–5; Gal. 3:27; Col. 2:12). To make the source of salvation perfectly clear Peter added, by the resurrection of Jesus Christ (cf. 1 Peter 1:3).1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 852.

Christ Brings Us To God Through Intercessory Prayer

1 Peter 3:22 KJV

Who is gone into heaven, and is on the right hand of God; angels and authorities and powers being made subject unto him.

The first statement is that Jesus “is at the right hand of God.” The root of this statement is in Ps. 110:1, which the early church interpreted christologically. The wording itself is found in Rom. 8:34, and the sense occurs in Acts 2:34; 5:31; Eph. 1:20; Col. 3:1; Heb. 1:3; 8:1; 10:11; 12:2. The meaning of the statement is clear: Jesus now reigns, for he sits in the place of power.

The second statement, “having gone into heaven,” is implied in the first, and it indicates the ascension that followed the resurrection of Jesus. The words also occur in Acts 1:10 in association with other ways of describing the ascension. Peter probably cites the ascension for two reasons: (1) it was traditional to mention it alongside the resurrection (3:18) and the session at God’s right hand, and (2) in ascending Christ passed triumphantly through the sphere of the principalities and powers over which he now reigns.

Thus the third statement declares Christ’s present reign over “angels and authorities and powers.” This is also derived from Ps. 110:1, along with Ps. 8:6, for if Jesus is now seated in the place of power, his enemies must be under his feet.

Romans 8:34 KJV

Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 5:47 PM September 8, 2020.

Essential Truths About Christ’s Suffering

Wednesday, August 19th, 2020


Essential Truths About Christ’s Suffering

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Atonement / 1 Peter 3:18

RECALL NOTICE:

The Maker of all human beings is recalling all units manufactured, regardless of make or year, due to a serious defect in the primary and central component of the heart.

This is due to a malfunction in the original prototype units code named Adam and Eve, resulting in the reproduction of the same defect in all subsequent units.

This defect has been technically termed, “Subsequential Internal Non-morality”, or more commonly known as S.I.N., as it is primarily expressed.

Some other symptoms:

1. Loss of direction

2. Foul vocal emissions

3. Amnesia of origin

4. Lack of peace and joy

5. Selfish, or violent behavior

6. Depression or confusion in the mental component

7. Fearfulness

8. Idolatry

9. Rebellion

The Manufacturer, who is neither liable nor at fault for this defect, is providing factory authorized repair and service free of charge to correct this SIN defect.

The Repair Technician, Jesus, has most generously offered to bear the entire burden of the staggering cost of these repairs. There is no additional fee required.

The number to call for repair in all areas is: P-R-A-Y-E-R. Once connected, please upload your burden of SIN through the REPENTANCE procedure.

Next, download ATONEMENT from the Repair Technician, Jesus, into the heart component.

No matter how big or small the SIN defect is, Jesus will replace it with:

1. Love

2. Joy

3. Peace

4. Patience

5. Kindness

6. Goodness

7. Faithfulness

8. Gentleness

9. Self control

Please see the operating manual, the B.I.B.L.E. (Believers Instructions Before Leaving Earth), for further details on the use of these fixes.

WARNING: Continuing to operate the human being unit without correction voids any manufacturer warranties, exposing the unit to dangers and problems too numerous to list and will result in the human unit being permanently impounded. For free emergency service, call on JESUS.

DANGER: The human being units not responding to this recall action will have to be scrapped in the furnace. The SIN defect will not be permitted to enter Heaven so as to prevent contamination of that facility.

Thank you for your immediate attention.

__________________

While The Apostle Peter was addressing the suffering and displaced pilgrims, he encouraged them to look at Jesus as one that suffered not for the bad, but in spite of being good.  

In our text verse we have the meat of the Gospel. Mankind is does have a defective flaw and Jesus’ suffering was used to repair that flaw. Tonight we will see truths about Jesus’ suffering that will not only show us His love for us, but also will show us how we can view our own sufferings when we suffer for righteousness’ sake.

Christ Suffered Once

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

One transaction that settled the account.

Romans 6:10 KJV

For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.

Romans 8:3 KJV

For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:

Perpetual Suffering of Christ is not a Biblical concept.

Hebrews 7:27 KJV

Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people’s: for this he did once, when he offered up himself.

Isaiah 53:11 KJV

He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: By his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; For he shall bear their iniquities.

Christ was not just another sacrifice but it was THE sacrifice.

Hebrews 9:26 KJV

For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.

Hebrews 9:28 KJV

So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.

Christ the Righteous, suffered for Man the Sinner.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

Romans 5:8 KJV

But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

2 Corinthians 5:21 KJV

For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

Romans 3:21–24 KJV

But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; 

Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference: 

For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; 

Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:

Christ’s Suffering was to Lead us to God.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

Romans 5:1 KJV

Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:

Ephesians 2:18 KJV

For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.

Ephesians 3:12 KJV

In whom we have boldness and access with confidence by the faith of him.

Christ’s Suffering was Temporary, His Victory is Eternal.

1 Peter 3:18 KJV

For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

John 6:63 KJV

It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life.

Romans 8:11 KJV

But if the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you.

1 Corinthians 15:22 KJV

For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 6:08 PM August 19, 2020.

Be All You Can Be EVEN in 2020

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2020

Be All You Can Be in 2020

Pastor Don Carpenter / General

Not From Around Here: The Complicated Life of a Sojourner / Testimony; A Witness; Evangelism / 1 Peter 3:13–17

It is easy to lose hope and focus in the tumult that is life in 2020. We learned last week however, that it is possible to love life and see good days even now. The secret it good clean living. Seek peace, avoid evil and know God hears our prayers. This evening we are going to continue to discover Peter’s advice to the weary sojourners. Now that we have discovered that living a life we love and seeing good days is actually possible, how can we use this knowledge to help us live up to our potential? This evening we will discover three truths that will help us be all we can be EVEN in 2020.

Be Good

1 Peter 3:13 KJV

And who is he that will harm you, if ye be followers of that which is good?

The word “and” is, “seeing that God takes such good care of the righteous,” who is he that will harm you? This question was asked in view of the persecution and suffering through which these saints were going. Peter tells them that as a result of their righteous lives and God’s care, their blessedness will be such as to turn off all the malice of their persecutors and make their suffering itself to be a joy. The word “followers” is the translation of a Greek word meaning “zealots.” The verb means “to burn with zeal, to desire earnestly.”1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 87.

Proverbs 16:7 KJV

When a man’s ways please the LORD, He maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him.

Romans 8:31–33 KJV

What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us? 

He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things? 

Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God’s elect? It is God that justifieth.

Be Confident

1 Peter 3:14 KJV

But and if ye suffer for righteousness’ sake, happy are ye: and be not afraid of their terror, neither be troubled;

For even if suffering should occur, Christians are blessed and thus should not be frightened. The word here translated “blessed” (makarioi; cf. 4:14) was used by Jesus (Matt. 5:3–11). To be “blessed” in this context does not mean to “feel delighted” but to be “highly privileged.” 

Matthew 5:10–12 KJV

Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. 

Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Be Ready With An Answer.

Not only were these Christian Jews to find a refuge in Christ Jesus as they set Him apart as Lord of their lives, but they were to be ready to give an answer to these persecutors who attacked them and the Word of God which they believed. The words “give an answer” are the translation of a Greek word used as a legal term in the courts. It means literally “to talk off from,” and was used of an attorney who talked his client off from a charge preferred against him. He presented a verbal defense. The exhortation is to Christians to talk the Bible off from the charges preferred against it, thus presenting for it a verbal defense. Today, Modernism has preferred charges against the Word of God, has placed it in the dungeons of the destructive critic’s inquisition, and has charged it with gross errors, and with being man-made. It is not allowed to speak for itself except through the prosecuting attorney, the destructive critic. But those who believe in a whole Bible, rather than a Bible full of holes, are admonished not to remain silent in the face of this attack by Modernism, but to defend the Bible against these false charges by presenting a verbal defense for it, refuting the statements of the destructive critic.1

1 Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 11 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 89.

Psalm 119:46 KJV

I will speak of thy testimonies also before kings, And will not be ashamed.

Colossians 4:6 KJV

Let your speech be alway with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man.

Be Blameless

1 Peter 3:16–17 KJV

Having a good conscience; that, whereas they speak evil of you, as of evildoers, they may be ashamed that falsely accuse your good conversation in Christ. 

For it is better, if the will of God be so, that ye suffer for well doing, than for evil doing.

A believer’s testimony should not be given in an arrogant manner but with gentleness and respect. (“Respect” here is from phobos, “fear,” whereas “respect” for one’s wife [v. 7] is tim?, “honor.”) Christians who are not afraid in the face of persecution are able to witness respectfully to their faith in Christ. They then keep a clear (agath?n, “good”) conscience (syneid?sin; cf. 2:19; 3:21). Peter may have been alluding to the occasion when he denied Christ out of fear, in words that were neither gentle nor respectful.

Christians who suffer unjustly and keep a clear conscience put to shame those who slander their good behavior in Christ. Once again Peter encouraged his readers with the fact that good behavior is their best defense against unjust punishment and persecution.1

1 Roger M. Raymer, “1 Peter,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985), 850.

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An all-time favorite Bible teacher was Don Wilton. One day in class, Dr. Wilton told us about getting to serve on Billy Graham’s team for a crusade in Korea. Dr. Wilton told about sitting on the platform one night during the invitation, — right next to Billy Graham.

Dr. Wilton couldn’t help notice that during the invitation, Billy Graham started looking down at his fingernails. And he thought, “I can’t believe Dr. Graham is so unconcerned about this invitation that he would be studying his nails!”

Don was getting a little huffy on the inside, if you know what I mean. But just then, Billy Graham pointed to one of the Korean ladies who had come forward to talk to the counselors. And Billy said, “Do you see that lady? — She did my nails today, and I was able to lead her to the Lord.”

That’s the spirit and habit we need! — Looking for opportunities to tell more people about Jesus. It can help them for all eternity, and it can lighten our burden along the way.

Exported from Logos Bible Software, 12:02 PM July 22, 2020.